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On the Generalizability of Experimental Results in Economics: With A Response To Camerer

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  • Omar Al-Ubaydli
  • John A. List

Abstract

Economists are increasingly turning to the experimental method as a means to estimate causal effects. By using randomization to identify key treatment effects, theories previously viewed as untestable are now scrutinized, efficacy of public policies are now more easily verified, and stakeholders can swiftly add empirical evidence to aid their decision-making. This study provides an overview of experimental methods in economics, with a special focus on developing an economic theory of generalizability. Given that field experiments are in their infancy, our secondary focus pertains to a discussion of the various parameters that they identify, and how they add to scientific knowledge. We conclude that until we conduct more field experiments that build a bridge between the lab and the naturally-occurring settings of interest we cannot begin to make strong conclusions empirically on the crucial question of generalizability from the lab to the field.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19666.

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Date of creation: Nov 2013
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19666

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Cited by:
  1. Adrian Beck & Rudolf Kerschbamer & Jianying Qiu, & Matthias Sutter, 2009. "Car Mechanics in the Lab - Investigating the Behavior of Real Experts on Experimental Markets for Credence Goods," Working Papers 2009-27, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.

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