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Commuting Time and Labour Supply: A Causal Effect?

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Author Info

  • Gimenez-Nadal, Jose Ignacio

    ()
    (University of Zaragoza)

  • Molina, José Alberto

    ()
    (University of Zaragoza)

Abstract

We analyze the causal effect of the length of the worker’s commute on worker's productivity, by examining whether commuting time has any effect on worker's labour market supply. Using the Spanish Time Use Survey 2002-03, our GMM/IV estimation yields a positive causal impact of commuting time on the time devoted to the labour market, with one hour of commuting increasing the time devoted to the labour market by 35 minutes in a working day. Our results shed light on the relationship between commuting and workers behaviour, since daily labour supply should be considered in theoretical models to provide a comprehensive view of commuter behaviour.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5529.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5529

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Related research

Keywords: commuting; labour supply; productivity; causality; Time Use Survey;

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References

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  1. Jose Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Alberto Molina & Raquel Ortega, 2012. "Self-employed mothers and the work-family conflict," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(17), pages 2133-2147, June.
  2. Alastair R. Hall & Glenn D. Rudebusch & David W. Wilcox, 1994. "Judging instrument relevance in instrumental variables estimation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 94-3, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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Cited by:
  1. Homann, Malte & Jensen, Uwe, 2013. "Does better education cause higher income?," HWWI Research Papers 145, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  2. Gershenson, Seth, 2013. "The causal effect of commute time on labor supply: Evidence from a natural experiment involving substitute teachers," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 127-140.

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