Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

They Are Even Larger! More (on) Puzzling Labor Market Volatilities

Contents:

Author Info

  • Gartner, Hermann

    ()
    (Institute for Employment Research (IAB), Nuremberg)

  • Merkl, Christian

    ()
    (University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)

  • Rothe, Thomas

    ()
    (Institute for Employment Research (IAB), Nuremberg)

Abstract

This paper shows that the German labor market is more volatile than the US labor market. Specifically, the volatility of the cyclical component of several labor market variables (e.g., the job-finding rate, labor market tightness, and job vacancies) divided by the volatility of labor productivity is roughly twice as large as in the United States. We derive and simulate a simple dynamic labor market model with heterogeneous worker productivity. This model is able to explain the higher German labor market volatilities by a longer expected job duration.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp4403.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 4403.

as in new window
Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4403

Contact details of provider:
Postal: IZA, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany
Phone: +49 228 3894 223
Fax: +49 228 3894 180
Web page: http://www.iza.org

Order Information:
Postal: IZA, Margard Ody, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany
Email:

Related research

Keywords: job-finding rate; labor market volatilities; unemployment; worker flows; vacancies; market tightness;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Robert E. Hall & Paul R. Milgrom, 2007. "The Limited Influence of Unemployment on the Wage Bargain," Levine's Bibliography 321307000000000135, UCLA Department of Economics.
  2. Hagedorn, Marcus & Manovskii, Iourii, 2008. "The cyclical behavior of equilibrium unemployment and vacancies revisited," Working Paper Series 0853, European Central Bank.
  3. Ronald Bachmann, 2005. "Labour Market Dynamics in Germany: Hirings, Separations, and Job-to-Job Transitions over the Business Cycle," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2005-045, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  4. Andreas Hornstein & Per Krusell & Giovanni L. Violante, 2005. "Unemployment and vacancy fluctuations in the matching model: inspecting the mechanism," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Sum, pages 19-50.
  5. Merkl, Christian & Schmitz, Tom, 2011. "Macroeconomic volatilities and the labor market: First results from the euro experiment," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 44-60, March.
  6. James S. Costain & Michael Reiter, 2003. "Business cycles, unemployment insurance and the calibration of matching models," Economics Working Papers 872, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Oct 2006.
  7. Merkl, Christian & Snower, Dennis J., 2008. "Escaping the unemployment trap: The case of East Germany," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 542-556, December.
  8. Brown, Alessio J G & Merkl, Christian & Snower, Dennis J., 2009. "An Incentive Theory of Matching," CEPR Discussion Papers 7283, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Robert E. Hall, 2005. "Employment Fluctuations with Equilibrium Wage Stickiness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 50-65, March.
  10. Christian Haefke & Marcus Sonntag & Thijs van Rens, 2012. "Wage Rigidity and Job Creation," Working Papers 629, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  11. Robert Shimer, 2005. "The Cyclical Behavior of Equilibrium Unemployment and Vacancies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 25-49, March.
  12. Olivier J. Blanchard & Lawrence H. Summers, 1986. "Hysteresis and the European Unemployment Problem," NBER Working Papers 1950, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Barbara Petrongolo & Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Looking Into the Black Box: A Survey of the Matching Function," CEP Discussion Papers dp0470, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  14. Lechthaler, Wolfgang & Merkl, Christian & Snower, Dennis J., 2008. "Monetary Persistence and the Labor Market: A New Perspective," IZA Discussion Papers 3513, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. Shigeru Fujita & Garey Ramey, 2006. "The Dynamic Beveridge Curve," 2006 Meeting Papers 239, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  16. Merkl, Christian & Snower, Dennis J., 2006. "The Caring Hand that Cripples: The East German Labour Market after Reunification," CEPR Discussion Papers 5656, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  17. Kai Christoffel & Keith Kuester & Tobias Linzert, 2009. "The Role of Labor Markets for Euro Area Monetary Policy," Kiel Working Papers 1513, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Brown, Alessio J G & Merkl, Christian & Snower, Dennis J., 2007. "Comparing the Effectiveness of Employment Subsidies," CEPR Discussion Papers 6334, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Lechthaler, Wolfgang & Merkl, Christian & Snower, Dennis J., 2010. "Monetary Persistence and the Labor Market: A New Perspective," CEPR Discussion Papers 7650, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Mark Weder & Michael Burda, 2010. "Payroll Taxes, Social Insurance and Business Cycles," 2010 Meeting Papers 781, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Christian Merkl & Dennis Wesselbaum, 2009. "Extensive vs. Intensive Margin in Germany and the United States: Any Differences?," Kiel Working Papers 1563, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  5. Jung, Philip & Kuhn, Moritz, 2011. "Labor Market Rigidity and Business Cycle Volatility," MPRA Paper 48946, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Philip, Jung & Moritz, Kuhn, 2011. "The Era of the U.S.-Europe Labor Market Divide: What can we learn?," MPRA Paper 32322, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Moritz Kuhn & Philip Jung, 2010. "Labor market rigidity and the transmission of business cycle shocks," 2010 Meeting Papers 595, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  8. Gartner, Hermann & Merkl, Christian & Rothe, Thomas, 2012. "Sclerosis and large volatilities: Two sides of the same coin," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(1), pages 106-109.
  9. Bachmann, Rüdiger & Bayer, Christian & Seth, Stefan & Wellschmied, Felix, 2013. "Cyclicality of Job and Worker Flows: New Data and a New Set of Stylized Facts," IZA Discussion Papers 7192, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Stüber, Heiko, 2012. "Are real entry wages rigid over the business cycle? : Empirical evidence for Germany from 1977 to 2009," IAB Discussion Paper 201206, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  11. Kienzler, Daniel, 2012. "Long-term Unemployment over the Business Cycle, Skill Loss, and Monetary Policy," Working Papers on Finance 1205, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4403. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Fallak).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.