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Time for behavioral political economy? An analysis of articles in behavioral economics

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Author Info

  • Berggren, Niclas

    ()
    (The Ratio Institute)

Abstract

This study analyzes leading research in behavioral economics to see whether it contains advocacy of paternalism and whether it addresses the potential cognitive limitations and biases of the policymakers who are going to implement paternalist policies. The findings reveal that 20.7% of the studied articles in behavioral economics propose paternalist policy action and that 95.5% of these do not contain any analysis of the cognitive ability of policymakers. This suggests that behavioral political economy, in which the analytical tools of behavioral economics are applied to political decision-makers as well, would offer a useful extension of the research program.

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File URL: http://ratio.se/media/81477/nb_behavioral.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The Ratio Institute in its series Ratio Working Papers with number 166.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: 19 May 2011
Date of revision:
Publication status: Forthcoming as Berggren, Niclas, 'Time for behavioral political economy? An analysis of articles in behavioral economics' in Review of Austrian Economics, 2011.
Handle: RePEc:hhs:ratioi:0166

Contact details of provider:
Postal: The Ratio Institute, P.O. Box 5095, SE-102 42 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: 08-441 59 00
Fax: 08-441 59 29
Email:
Web page: http://www.ratio.se/
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Related research

Keywords: Behavioral economics; Anomalies; Rationality; Homo economicus; Public choice;

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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Behavioural blackboards
    by Eric Crampton in Offsetting Behaviour on 2012-02-27 18:00:00
  2. Paternalism - for children, and for the lower orders
    by Eric Crampton in Offsetting Behaviour on 2012-06-05 00:00:00
  3. Behavioural politics
    by jamesz in TVHE on 2012-07-30 00:36:02
Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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Cited by:
  1. Eric Crampton & Matt Burgess & Brad Taylor, 2011. "The Cost of Cost Studies," Working Papers in Economics 11/29, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
  2. Schnellenbach, Jan & Schubert, Christian, 2014. "Behavioral public choice: A survey," Freiburg Discussion Papers on Constitutional Economics 14/03, Walter Eucken Institut e.V..
  3. Shastitko, A., 2011. "Errors of I and II Types in Economic Exchanges with Third Party Enforcement," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, issue 10, pages 125-148.
  4. Libman, Alexander, 2012. "Перераспределительные Конфликты И Факторы Культуры В Новой Политической Экономии
    [Redistributive Conflicts and Culture in the
    ," MPRA Paper 48192, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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