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The impact of agroforestry-based soil fertility replenishment practices on the poor in Western Kenya:

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Author Info

  • Place, Frank
  • Adato, Michelle
  • Hebinck, Paul
  • Omosa, Mary

Abstract

"Western Kenya is one of the most densely populated areas in Africa. Farming there is characterized by low inputs and low crop productivity. Poverty is rampant in the region. Yet the potential for agriculture is considered good. In the study described here, researchers looked specifially at soil fertility replenishment (SFR) systems...Focused on two specific systems the tree-based "improved fallow" system and the biomass transfer system the study compared rates of adoption in poor and nonpoor communities and evaluated the extent to which their adoption reduced poverty." From Authors' Summary

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series Research reports with number 142.

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Date of creation: 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fpr:resrep:142

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Related research

Keywords: Agroforestry Kenya; Soil fertility Kenya; Poor Africa; Agroforestry Extension; Agroforestry projects; Gender; Natural resource management; Agricultural technology; Agricultural growth;

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References

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  1. Fafchamps, Marcel & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 1999. "Social roles, human capital, and the intrahousehold division of labor," FCND discussion papers 73, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Place, Frank & Adato, Michelle & Hebinck, Paul & Omosa, Mary, 2005. "The impact of agroforestry-based soil fertility replenishment practices on the poor in Western Kenya:," Research reports 142, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Kadiyala, Suneetha & Gillespie, Stuart, 2003. "Rethinking food aid to fight AIDS," FCND briefs 159, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Swinkels, R.A. & Franzel, S. & Shepherd, K.D. & Ohlsson, E. & Ndufa, J.K., 1997. "The economics of short rotation improved fallows: evidence from areas of high population density in Western Kenya," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 99-121, September.
  5. Loevinsohn, Michael & Gillespie, Stuart, 2003. "HIV/AIDS, food security and rural livelihoods," FCND discussion papers 157, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Hans-Peter Kohler & Jere R. Behrman & Susan Cotts Watkins, 1999. "The structure of social networks and fertility decisions: evidence from S. Nyanza District, Kenya," MPIDR Working Papers WP-1999-005, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  7. Haddad, Lawrence James & Adato, Michelle, 2001. "How effectively do public works programs transfer benefits to the poor?," FCND briefs 108, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela & Adato, Michelle & Haddad, Lawrence James & Hazell, P.B.R., 2004. "Science and poverty," Food policy reports 16, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Adato, Michelle & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela, 2002. "Assessing the impact of agricultural research on poverty using the sustainable livelihoods framework," FCND discussion papers 128, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Place, Frank & Adato, Michelle & Hebinck, Paul & Mary Omosa, 2003. "The impact of agroforestry-based soil fertility replenishment practices on the poor in Western Kenya," FCND discussion papers 160, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Adato, Michelle & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela (ed.), 2007. "Agricultural research, livelihoods, and poverty: Studies of economic and social impacts in six countries," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-8018-8721-6.
  4. Akinola, A.A. & Alene, Arega D. & Adeyemo, R. & Sanogo, D. & Olanrewaju, A.S. & Nwoke, C. & Nziguheba, G., 0. "Determinants of adoption and intensity of use of balance nutrient management systems technologies in the northern Guinea savanna of Nigeria," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universit├Ąt zu Berlin, vol. 49.
  5. Kiptot, Evelyne & Hebinck, Paul & Franzel, Steven & Richards, Paul, 2007. "Adopters, testers or pseudo-adopters? Dynamics of the use of improved tree fallows by farmers in western Kenya," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 509-519, May.
  6. Place, Frank & Adato, Michelle & Hebinck, Paul, 2007. "Understanding Rural Poverty and Investment in Agriculture: An Assessment of Integrated Quantitative and Qualitative Research in Western Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 312-325, February.

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