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Assessing the impact of agricultural research on poverty using the sustainable livelihoods framework:

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  • Adato, Michelle
  • Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela

Abstract

As the goals of international agricultural research move beyond increasing food production to the broader aims of reducing poverty, both agricultural research and studies of its impact become more complex. Yet examining the magnitude and mechanisms through which different types of agricultural research are able to help the poor is essential, not only to evaluate claims for continued funding of such research, but more importantly, to guide future research in ways that will make the greatest contribution to poverty reduction. This paper reports on the approach used in a multicountry study of the poverty impact of research programs under the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). The studies use an expanded understanding of poverty that goes beyond income- or consumption-based headcounts or severity measures, to consider many other factors that poor people in different contexts define as contributing to their vulnerability, poverty, and well-being. The sustainable livelihoods framework provides a common conceptual approach to examining the ways in which agricultural research and technologies fit (or sometimes do not fit) into the livelihood strategies of households or individuals with different types of assets and other resources, strategies that often involve multiple activities undertaken at different times of the year. This paper reports on the conceptual framework, methods, and findings to date of these studies. It provides an overview of the sustainable livelihoods approach, how it can be applied to agricultural research, and describes detailed methods and results from five case studies: (1) modern rice varieties in Bangladesh; (2) polyculture fishponds and vegetable gardens in Bangladesh; (3) soil fertility management practices in Kenya; (4) hybrid maize in Zimbabwe; and (5) creolized maize varieties in Mexico.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series EPTD discussion papers with number 89.

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Date of creation: 2002
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:eptddp:89

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Keywords: Soil fertility Kenya.; Hybrid maize Zimbabwe.; Maize Mexico.; Fish-culture Bangladesh.; Rice Bangladesh.; Sustainable livelihoods.; Agricultural research.; Poverty alleviation.;

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References

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  1. Place, Frank & Adato, Michelle & Hebinck, Paul & Omosa, Mary, 2005. "The impact of agroforestry-based soil fertility replenishment practices on the poor in Western Kenya:," Research reports, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 142, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Knox, Anna & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela & Hazell, P. B. R., 1998. "Property rights, collective action and technologies for natural resource management: a conceptual framework," CAPRi working papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Bouis, Howarth E., 1994. "Agricultural technology and food policy to combat iron deficiency in developing countries," FCND discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Bellon, Mauricio R. & Risopoulos, Jean, 2001. "Small-Scale Farmers Expand the Benefits of Improved Maize Germplasm: A Case Study from Chiapas, Mexico," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 799-811, May.
  5. Kerr, John M. & Kolavalli, Shashi, 1999. "Impact of agricultural research on poverty alleviation: conceptual framework with illustrations from the literature," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 56, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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Cited by:
  1. Philip Pardey & Julian Alston & Connie Chan-Kang & Eduardo Magalhães & Stephen Vosti, 2003. "Assessing and Attributing the Benefits from Varietal Improvement Research: Evidence from Embrapa, Brazil," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies 2003-06, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
  2. World Bank, 2004. "Drivers of Sustainable Rural Growth and Poverty Reduction in Central America : Honduras Case Study, Volume 1. Executive Summary and Main Text," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14399, The World Bank.
  3. Savath, Vivien & Fletschner, Diana & Peterman, Amber & Santos, Florence, 2014. "Land, assets, and livelihoods: Gendered analysis of evidence from Odisha State in India:," IFPRI discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 1323, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Ryan, James G., 2002. "Agricultural Research and Poverty Alleviation: Some International Perspectives," Working Papers, Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research 118375, Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research.
  5. Smale, Melinda & Zambrano, Patricia & Falck-Zepeda, José & Gruère, Guillaume, 2006. "Parables: applied economics literature about the impact of genetically engineered crop varieties in developing economies," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 158, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Sellamuttu, Sonali Senaratna & Aida, Takeshi & Kasahara, Ryuji & Sawada, Yasuyuki & Wijerathna, Deeptha, 2013. "How Access to Irrigation Influences Poverty and Livelihoods:A Case Study from Sri Lanka," Working Papers, JICA Research Institute 59, JICA Research Institute.
  7. Adenuga, A. H. & Fakayode, S. B. & Opeyemi, G. & Adedeji, O. S. & Idowu, R., 2012. "Implication of the Niger River Dredging on the Livelihood of Arable Farming Households in Niger State, Nigeria," 2012 Eighth AFMA Congress, November 25-29, 2012, Nairobi, Kenya, African Farm Management Association (AFMA) 159215, African Farm Management Association (AFMA).
  8. Gruère, Guillaume & Giuliani, Alessandra & Smale, Melinda, 2006. "Marketing underutilized plant species for the benefit of the poor: a conceptual framework," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 154, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  9. Pender, John, 2004. "Development pathways for hillsides and highlands: some lessons from Central America and East Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 339-367, August.
  10. Madzivhandila, T.P. & Groenewald, Izak & Griffith, Garry R. & Fleming, Euan M., 2008. "Continuous Improvement and Innovation as an Approach to Effective Research and Development: A 'Trident' Evaluation of the Beef Profit Partnerships Project," 2008 Conference (52nd), February 5-8, 2008, Canberra, Australia, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society 6017, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  11. van den Berg, Marrit, 2010. "Household income strategies and natural disasters: Dynamic livelihoods in rural Nicaragua," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 592-602, January.
  12. Di Falco, Salvatore & Chavas, Jean-Paul & Smale, Melinda, 2006. "Farmer management of production risk on degraded lands: the role of wheat genetic diversity in Tigray Region, Ethiopia," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 153, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  13. Linacre, Nicholas & Falck-Zepeda, José & Komen, John & MacLaren, Donald, 2006. "Risk assessment and management of genetically modified organisms under Australia's Gene Technology Act:," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 157, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  14. Jansen, Hans G.P. & Siegel, Paul B. & Pichón, Francisco, 2005. "Identifying the drivers of sustainable rural growth and poverty reduction in Honduras," DSGD discussion papers 19, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  15. Falck Zepeda, José & Barreto-Triana, Nancy & Baquero-Haeberlin, Irma & Espitia-Malagón, Eduardo & Fierro-Guzmán, Humberto & López, Nancy, 2006. "An exploration of the potential benefits of integrated pest management systems and the use of insect resistant potatoes to control the Guatemalan Tuber Moth (Tecia solanivora Povolny) in Ventaquemada,," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 152, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  16. Bantilan, MCS & Ravula, P & Parthasarathy, D & Gandhi, BVJ, 2006. "Gender and Social Capital Mediated Technology Adoption," MPRA Paper 10627, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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