Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The structure of social networks and fertility decisions: evidence from S. Nyanza District, Kenya

Contents:

Author Info

  • Hans-Peter Kohler

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Jere R. Behrman
  • Susan Cotts Watkins

Abstract

Demographers have increasingly argued that social interaction is an important mechanism for understanding fertility behavior. Yet, substantial uncertainty exists whether ´social learning´ or ´social influence´ constitutes the dominant mechanism through which social networks affect individual´s contraceptive decisions. This paper argues that thesse mechanism can be distinguished by analyzing the density of the social network ant its interaction with the proportion of contraceptive users among network partners. Our analyses that in areas with high market activity social learning is most relevant, where in regions with only modest market activity social influence constitutes the dominant mechanism of how social networks affect women´s contraceptive use. In areas in which social influence retards diffusion of family planning, therefore, with sufficient market development social learning may become more important than social influence and accelerate diffusion. (AUTHORS)

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/demography/toc/dem38.1.html
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its series MPIDR Working Papers with number WP-1999-005.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: May 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-1999-005

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

Related research

Keywords:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Jere Behrman & Hans-Peter Kohler & Susan C. Watkins, 2003. "Social Networks, HIV/AIDS and Risk Perceptions," PIER Working Paper Archive 03-007, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  2. Kirsten P. Smith & Susan Cotts Watkins, 2005. "Perceptions of Risk and Strategies for Prevention: Responses to HIV/AIDS in Rural Malawi," PGDA Working Papers 0305, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
  3. Place, Frank & Adato, Michelle & Hebinck, Paul & Mary Omosa, 2003. "The impact of agroforestry-based soil fertility replenishment practices on the poor in Western Kenya," FCND discussion papers 160, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Hedström, Peter & Kolm, Ann-Sofie & Åberg, Yvonne, 2003. "Social interactions and unemployment," Working Paper Series 2003:15, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  5. Robert G. White & Laura Bernardi, 2008. "Close kin influences on fertility behavior," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2008-024, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  6. Philip Kreager, 2009. "Darwin and Lotka," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(16), pages 469-502, October.
  7. FFF1Christoph NNN1Bühler & FFF2Hans-Peter NNN2Kohler, 2003. "Talking about AIDS," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 1(13), pages 397-438, September.
  8. King , Elizabeth M. & Behrman, Jere R., 2008. "Timing and duration of exposure in evaluations of social programs," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4686, The World Bank.
  9. FFF1Enid NNN1Schatz, 2003. "Comparing, Contextualizing, and Conceptualizing," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 1(5), pages 143-174, September.
  10. J. Peter Neary, 2006. "Introduction to the Special Issue," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 37(2), pages 121-122.
  11. Cormac Ó Gráda, 2006. "Dublin Jewish Demography a Century Ago," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 37(2), pages 123-147.
  12. Hans-Peter Kohler & Jere R. Behrman & Susan Watkins, 2000. "Empirical Assessments of Social Networks, Fertility and Family Planning Programs," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(7), September.
  13. Christoph Bühler & Ewa Fratczak, 2005. "Learning from others and receiving support: the impact of personal networks on fertility intentions in Poland," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2005-017, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  14. Francesco C. Billari & Hans-Peter Kohler, 2002. "Patterns of lowest-low fertility in Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2002-040, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  15. Christoph Bühler, 2008. "On the structural value of children and its implication on intended fertility in Bulgaria," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 18(20), pages 569-610, June.
  16. FFF1Susan NNN1Watkins & FFF2Ina NNN2Warriner, 2003. "How do we know we need to control for selectivity?," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 1(4), pages 109-142, September.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-1999-005. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Wilhelm).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.