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Estimating utility-consistent poverty lines

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  • Arndt, Channing
  • Simler, Kenneth R.

Abstract

"With the focus of international development resources increasingly turned toward poverty reduction, the demand for reliable empirical estimates of poverty levels has grown dramatically... This paper contributes to the poverty measurement literature by introducing an information theoretic approach to assuring the utility consistency of poverty lines. Even though the philosophical roots of information theory and the links between information theory and other estimation criteria fill volumes, the actual practical application of the approach is quite straightforward." From Text

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series FCND briefs with number 189.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:fcndbr:189

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Keywords: Poverty lines ; Poverty alleviation ; Development projects Evaluation ; measurement ; Entropy estimation ;

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References

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  1. Fafchamps, Marcel & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 1999. "Social roles, human capital, and the intrahousehold division of labor," FCND discussion papers 73, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Golan, Amos & Judge, George G. & Miller, Douglas, 1996. "Maximum Entropy Econometrics," Staff General Research Papers 1488, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  3. Haddad, Lawrence James & Adato, Michelle, 2001. "How effectively do public works programs transfer benefits to the poor?," FCND discussion papers 108, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Foster, James & Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "A Class of Decomposable Poverty Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 761-66, May.
  5. Datt, Gaurav & Jolliffe, Dean & Sharma, Manohar, 1998. "A profile of poverty in Egypt: 1997," FCND discussion papers 49, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Gibson, John & Rozelle, Scott, 2003. "Poverty and Access to Roads in Papua New Guinea," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(1), pages 159-85, October.
  7. Tarp, Finn & Simler, Kenneth & Matusse, Cristina & Heltberg, Rasmus & Dava, Gabriel, 2002. "The robustness of poverty profiles reconsidered," FCND discussion papers 124, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 2003. "On the utility consistency of poverty lines," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3157, The World Bank.
  9. Zellner, A., 1988. "Optimal Information-Processing And Bayes' Theorem," Papers m8803, Southern California - Department of Economics.
  10. Golan, Amos, 2002. "Information and Entropy Econometrics--Editor's View," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 107(1-2), pages 1-15, March.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Fox, Louise & Sohnesen, Thomas Pave, 2013. "Household enterprises in Mozambique : key to poverty reduction but not on the development agenda ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6570, The World Bank.
  2. Kenneth R. Simler & Channing Arndt, 2007. "Poverty Comparisons With Absolute Poverty Lines Estimated From Survey Data," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 53(2), pages 275-294, 06.
  3. Arndt, Channing & Thurlow, James, 2009. "Inequality and Poverty Impacts of Trade Distortions in Mozambique," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 52794, World Bank.
  4. Simler, Kenneth R. & Arndt, Channing, 2006. "Poverty Comparisons with Endogenous Absolute Poverty Lines," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25775, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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