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Accounting for real exchange rates using micro-data

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  • Mario J. Crucini
  • Anthony Landry

Abstract

The classical dichotomy predicts that all of the time series variance in the aggregate real exchange rate is accounted for by nontraded goods in the CPI basket because traded goods obey the Law of One Price. In stark contrast, Engel (1999) found that traded goods had comparable volatility to the aggregate real exchange. Our work reconciles these two views by successfully applying the classical dichotomy at the level of intermediate inputs into the production of final goods using highly disaggregated retail price data. Since the typical good found in the CPI basket is about equal parts traded and nontraded inputs, we conclude that the classical dichotomy applied to intermediate inputs restores its conceptual value.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas in its series Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper with number 108.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:fip:feddgw:108

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  1. Caroline M. Betts & Timothy J. Kehoe, 2004. "U.S. real exchange rate fluctuations and relative price fluctuations," Staff Report 334, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  2. W. E. G. Salter, 1959. "Internal And External Balance: The Role Op Price And Expenditure Effects," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 35(71), pages 226-238, 08.
  3. Ariel Burstein & Martin Eichenbaum & Sergio Rebelo, 2004. "Large Devaluations and the Real Exchange Rate," NBER Working Papers 10986, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Engel, C. & Rogers, J.H., 1995. "How Wide is the Border?," Papers 4-95-16, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
  5. Ariel T. Burstein & Joao C. Neves & Sergio Rebelo, 2000. "Distribution Costs and Real Exchange Rate Dynamics During Exchange-Rate-Based Stabilizations," RCER Working Papers 473, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  6. Parsley, David & Popper, Helen, 2009. "Understanding Real Exchange Rate Movements with Trade in Intermediate Products," MPRA Paper 21117, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. T. W.Swan, 1960. "Economic Control In A Dependent Economy," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 36(73), pages 51-66, 03.
  8. Mario J. Crucini & Chris I. Telmer & Marios Zachariadis, 2005. "Understanding European Real Exchange Rates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(3), pages 724-738, June.
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Cited by:
  1. Mario J. Crucini, 2011. "Comment on "Nontraded Goods Prices, Terms of Trade and International Risk-Sharing: An Empirical Investigation"," NBER Chapters, in: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2011, pages 470-476 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Mario J. Crucini & J. Scott Davis, 2013. "Distribution capital and the short- and long-run import demand elasticity," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 137, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  3. Giancarlo Corsetti & Luca Dedola & Francesca Viani, 2012. "Traded and Nontraded Goods Prices, and International Risk Sharing: An Empirical Investigation," NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(1), pages 403 - 466.
  4. Marianne Baxter & Anthony Landry, 2012. "IKEA: product, pricing, and pass-through," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 132, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  5. Mario J. Crucini & Hakan Yilmazkuday, 2013. "Understanding Long-run Price Dispersion," NBER Working Papers 18811, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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