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Capital-skill complementarity and inequality: a sensitivity analysis

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  • Linnea Polgreen
  • Pedro Silos

Abstract

In “Capital-Skill Complementarity and Inequality: A Macroeconomic Analysis,” Krusell et al. (2000) analyzed the capital-skill complementarity hypothesis as an explanation for the behavior of the U.S. skill premium. This paper shows that their model’s fit and the values of the estimated parameters are very sensitive to the data used: Alternative measures of the capital series predict skill premia that bear little resemblance to the data. We also include ten additional years of data to address the claim made by other authors that the evolution of the skill premium changed during the 1990s, but we find little evidence of this change.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta in its series Working Paper with number 2005-20.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2005-20

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Ariell Reshef, 2012. "Online Appendix to "Is Technological Change Biased Towards the Unskilled in Services? An Empirical Investigation"," Technical Appendices 11-241, Review of Economic Dynamics.
  2. Federico S. Mandelman & Andrei Zlate, 2010. "Immigration, remittances, and business cycles," Working Paper 2008-25, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  3. Jonathan Vogel & Javier Cravino & Ariel Burstein, 2011. "Importing Skill-Biased Technology," 2011 Meeting Papers 440, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Andri Chassamboulli & Theodore Palivos, 2014. "A Search‐Equilibrium Approach To The Effects Of Immigration On Labor Market Outcomes," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 55, pages 111-129, 02.
  5. Manuel A. Hidalgo Pérez & Jesús Rodríguez López & José María O´Kean Alonso, 2008. "Labor Demand and Information Technologies: Evidence for Spain, 1980-2005," Working Papers 08.12, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics.
  6. Michael Ben-Gad, 2006. "Capital-Skill Complementarity and the Immigration Surplus," DEGIT Conference Papers c011_047, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
  7. Ariell Reshef, 2008. "Is Technological Change Biased Towards the Unskilled in Services? An Empirical Investigation," 2008 Meeting Papers 235, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  8. Linnea Polgreen & Pedro Silos, 2008. "Capital-Skill Complementarity and Inequality: A Sensitivity Analysis," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(2), pages 302-313, April.
  9. Chassamboulli, Andri & Palivos, Theodore, 2010. ""Give me your Tired, your Poor," so I can Prosper: Immigration in Search Equilibrium," MPRA Paper 32379, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Polgreen, Linnea & Silos, Pedro, 2009. "Crude substitution: The cyclical dynamics of oil prices and the skill premium," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 409-418, April.
  11. Oleksiy Kryvtsov & Alexander Ueberfeldt, 2007. "Schooling, Inequality and Government Policy," Working Papers 07-12, Bank of Canada.
  12. Sang-Wook (Stanley) Cho & Juliàn P. Dìaz, 2014. "Accounting for Skill Premium Patterns during the EU Accession: Productivity or Trade?," Discussion Papers 2014-14, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

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