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A Method for Taking Models to the Data

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  • Peter Ireland

    ()
    (Boston College)

Abstract

This paper develops a method for combining the power of a dynamic, stochastic, general equilibrium model with the flexibility of a vector autoregressive time-series model to obtain a hybrid that can be taken directly to the data. It estimates this hybrid model via maximum likelihood and uses the results to address a number of issues concerning the ability of a prototypical real business cycle model to explain movements in aggregate output and employment in the postwar US economy, the stability of the real business cycle model's structural parameters, and the performance of the hybrid model's out-of-sample forecasts.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Society for Computational Economics in its series Computing in Economics and Finance 1999 with number 1233.

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Date of creation: 01 Mar 1999
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Handle: RePEc:sce:scecf9:1233

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Postal: CEF99, Boston College, Department of Economics, Chestnut Hill MA 02467 USA
Fax: +1-617-552-2308
Web page: http://fmwww.bc.edu/CEF99/
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  39. Smith, A A, Jr, 1993. "Estimating Nonlinear Time-Series Models Using Simulated Vector Autoregressions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(S), pages S63-84, Suppl. De.
  40. Ireland, Peter N., 1997. "A small, structural, quarterly model for monetary policy evaluation," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 83-108, December.
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