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School Exclusion as Social Exclusion: The Practices And Effects of Conditional Cash Transfer Programme for the Poor in Bangladesh

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  • Naomi Hossain

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    Abstract

    This paper explores the efforts of government to interrupt the intergenerational transmission of poverty. It focuses on the practices and effects of the Primary Education Stipend Programme, a conditional cash transfer designed to attract the rural poor into school. It documents how the objects of policy – rural poor children and parents - are ‘seen’ by the state, and the sightings of the state they in turn receive. It also analyses the tools and technologies of the intervention, focusing on its targeting practices.

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    File URL: http://www.esocialsciences.org/Download/repecDownload.aspx?fname=Document11782009520.4472772.pdf&fcategory=Articles&AId=2177&fref=repec
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:2177.

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    Date of creation: Aug 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2177

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    Web page: http://www.esocialsciences.org

    Related research

    Keywords: poverty; school; Bangladesh; rural; poor children; education; education stipend; stipend; cash transfer; cash; parents; state; tools; technologies; primay education;

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    1. Sarah C. White, 2002. "Being, becoming and relationship: conceptual challenges of a child rights approach in development," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(8), pages 1095-1104.
    2. M. N. Asadullah & S. Rahman, 2009. "Farm productivity and efficiency in rural Bangladesh: the role of education revisited," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(1), pages 17-33.
    3. Sen, Binayak, 2003. "Drivers of Escape and Descent: Changing Household Fortunes in Rural Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 513-534, March.
    4. Mohammad Niaz Asadullah (SKOPE, Department of Economics), . "Returns to Education in Bangladesh," QEH Working Papers qehwps130, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    5. E. delap, 2001. "Economic and Cultural Forces in the Child Labour Debate: Evidence from Urban Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(4), pages 1-22.
    6. Sarah C. White, 2002. "From the politics of poverty to the politics of identity? Child rights and working children in Bangladesh," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(6), pages 725-735.
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