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Casting the net wide and deep: lessons learned in a mixed-methods study of poverty dynamics in rural Bangladesh

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  • Peter Davis

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  • Bob Baulch

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    Abstract

    In this paper we reflect on lessons learned in developing a mixed-methods approach to the study of poverty dynamics in a three phase qual-quant-qual study of poverty dynamics in rural Bangladesh. We argue that a sequential but integrated approach has a number of advantages over single-method approaches or non-integrated studies. In particular, mixed-methods research strengthens our ability to make more reliable causal inferences, both in individual life trajectories, and in collective trends. We also examine how integrating qualitative and quantitative methods raises important issues for poverty dynamics research, including the way that concepts are developed and deployed, how field research is designed and conducted, how causation is identified, and how findings are analysed and presented. [Working Paper No. 155]

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    Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:2674.

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    Date of creation: Jul 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2674

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    Keywords: poverty dynamics Bangladesh mixed methods;

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    1. Sen, Binayak, 2003. "Drivers of Escape and Descent: Changing Household Fortunes in Rural Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 513-534, March.
    2. Deaton, A. & Zaidi, S., 1999. "Guidelines for Constructing Consumption Aggregates for Welfare Analysis," Papers 192, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Development Studies.
    3. Davis, Peter, 2010. "Exploring the long-term impact of development interventions within life-history narratives in rural Bangladesh," IFPRI discussion papers 991, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Krishna, Anirudh, 2004. "Escaping Poverty and Becoming Poor: Who Gains, Who Loses, and Why?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 121-136, January.
    5. Richard Palmer-Jones, 2010. "Handbook on impact evaluation: quantitative methods and practices, by S.R. Khandker, G.B. Koolwal and H.A. Samad," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(3), pages 387-390.
    6. Krishna, Anirudh, 2006. "Pathways out of and into poverty in 36 villages of Andhra Pradesh, India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 271-288, February.
    7. Zeller, Manfred & Sharma, Manohar & Ahmed, Akhter U. & Rashid, Shahidur, 2001. "Group-based financial institutions for the rural poor in Bangladesh: an institutional- and household-level analysis," Research reports 120, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Alkire, Sabina & Foster, James, 2011. "Counting and multidimensional poverty measurement," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7), pages 476-487.
    9. Baulch, Bob, 2010. "The medium-term impact of the primary education stipend in rural Bangladesh," IFPRI discussion papers 976, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Ravallion, Martin, 2008. "Evaluating Anti-Poverty Programs," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    11. Davis, Peter, 2009. "Everyday forms of collective action in Bangladesh: Learning from Fifteen Cases," CAPRi working papers 94, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Carvalho, S. & White, H., 1997. "Combining the Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches to Poverty Measurement and Analysis. The Practice and the Potential," Papers 366, World Bank - Technical Papers.
    13. Shahidur R. Khandker & Gayatri B. Koolwal & Hussain A. Samad, 2010. "Handbook on Impact Evaluation : Quantitative Methods and Practices," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2693, October.
    14. Ragin, Charles C., 2000. "Fuzzy-Set Social Science," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226702766, March.
    15. Kumar, Neha & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2010. "Access, adoption, and diffusion," IFPRI discussion papers 995, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2003. "Payoffs from Panels in Low-Income Countries: Economic Development and Economic Mobility," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 112-117, May.
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