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What is the Importance of Monetary and Fiscal Shocks in Explaining US Macroeconomic Fluctuations?

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Author Info

  • Barbara Rossi
  • Sarah Zubairy

Abstract

This paper analyzes the importance of monetary and fiscal policy shocks in explaining US macroeconomic fluctuations, and establishes new stylized facts. The novelty of our empirical analysis is that we jointly consider both monetary and fiscal policy, whereas the existing literature only focuses on either one or the other. Our main findings are twofold: fiscal shocks are relatively more important in explaining medium cycle fluctuations whereas monetary policy shocks are relatively more important in explaining business cycle fluctuations; and failing to recognize that both monetary and fiscal policy simultaneously affect macroeconomic variables might incorrectly attribute the fluctuations to the wrong source.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Duke University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 11-02.

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Length: 33
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:duk:dukeec:11-02

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Department of Economics Duke University 213 Social Sciences Building Box 90097 Durham, NC 27708-0097
Phone: (919) 660-1800
Fax: (919) 684-8974
Web page: http://econ.duke.edu/

Related research

Keywords: Monetary policy; government spending; fiscal policy; business cycle fluctuations; medium cycle;

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Cited by:
  1. Eric Sims & Ruediger Bachmann, 2011. "Confidence and the Transmission of Government Spending Shocks," 2011 Meeting Papers 83, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Tommaso Monacelli & Roberto Perotti & Antonella Trigari, 2010. "Unemployment Fiscal Multipliers," NBER Working Papers 15931, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Eddie Gerba & Klemens Hauzenberger, 2013. "Estimating US Fiscal and Monetary Interactions in a Time Varying VAR," Studies in Economics 1303, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
  4. Valerie A. Ramey, 2009. "Identifying Government Spending Shocks: It's All in the Timing," NBER Working Papers 15464, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Gerald Carlino & Robert P. Inman, 2013. "Macro Fiscal Policy in Economic Unions: States as Agents," NBER Working Papers 19559, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Mauro Costantini & Antonio Paradiso, 2012. "Re-examining the Decline in the US Saving Rate: The Impact of Mortgage Equity Withdrawal," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1232, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  7. Alfred A. Haug & Tomasz Jedrzejowicz & Anna Sznajderska, 2013. "Combining Monetary and Fiscal Policy in an SVAR for a Small Open Economy," Working Papers 1313, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2013.
  8. Emily Anderson & Atsushi Inoue & Barbara Rossi, 2012. "Heterogeneous Consumers and Fiscal Policy Shocks," 2012 Meeting Papers 261, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  9. Daniel P. Murphy, 2013. "How does government spending stimulate consumption?," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 157, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.

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