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Criminal Networks: Who is the Key Player?

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  • Lee, Lung-Fei
  • Liu, Xiaodong
  • Patacchini, Eleonora
  • Zenou, Yves

Abstract

We analyze delinquent networks of adolescents in the United States. We develop a dynamic network formation model showing who the key player is, i.e. the criminal who once removed generates the highest possible reduction in aggregate crime level. We then structurally estimate our model using data on criminal behaviors of adolescents in the United States (AddHealth data). Compared to other criminals, key players are more likely to be a male, have less educated parents, are less attached to religion and feel socially more excluded. We also find that, even though some criminals are not very active in criminal activities, they can be key players because they have a crucial position in the network in terms of betweenness centrality.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 8772.

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Date of creation: Jan 2012
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8772

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Keywords: Bonacich centrality; crime policies; dynamic network formation;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Lindquist, Matthew & Zenou, Yves, 2014. "Key Players in Co-Offending Networks," CEPR Discussion Papers 9889, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Liu, Xiaodong & Patacchini, Eleonora & Zenou, Yves, 2014. "Endogenous peer effects: local aggregate or local average?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 39-59.
  3. William C. Horrace & Xiaodong Liu & Eleonora Patacchini, 2014. "Endogenous Network Production Functions with Selectivity," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 168, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  4. König, Michael & Tessone, Claudio J. & Zenou, Yves, 2012. "Nestedness in Networks: A Theoretical Model and Some Applications," CEPR Discussion Papers 8807, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Marcel Fafchamps & Mans Soderbom, 2011. "Network Proximity and Business Practices in African Manufacturing," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2011-08, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  6. Patacchini, Eleonora & Zenou, Yves, 2011. "Social Networks and Parental Behavior in the Intergenerational Transmission of Religion," CEPR Discussion Papers 8443, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Patacchini, Eleonora & Rainone, Edoardo & Zenou, Yves, 2011. "Dynamic Aspects of Teenage Friendships and Educational Attainment," CEPR Discussion Papers 8223, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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