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China, GMOs and World Trade in Agricultural and Textile Products

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  • Anderson, Kym
  • Yao, Shunli

Abstract

China has always strived for self-sufficiency in farm products, particularly staple foods. Its rapid industrialization following its opening up to global markets during the past two decades has been making that more difficult, and its accession to the WTO may add to that difficulty. New agricultural biotechnologies could ease that situation. The adoption and spread of some of those biotechnologies in agriculture have, however, raised concerns, particularly over the environmental and food safety effects of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). This Paper focuses on possible implications of the GMO controversy for China, since it is prospectively not only a major producer and consumer of GM farm products but also a potential exporter of some of them. It explores the potential economic effects of China not adopting versus adopting GMOs when some of its trading partners adopt that technology. The effects are shown to depend to a considerable extent on the trade policy stance taken in high-income countries opposed to GMOs and/or to liberalization of China’s trade in textiles and apparel.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 3171.

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Date of creation: Jan 2002
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3171

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Keywords: china; gmos; import ban; trade policy; wto;

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References

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  1. Carl Pray & Danmeng Ma & Jikun Huang & Fangbin Qiao, 2001. "Impact of Bt Cotton in China," CEMA Working Papers 510, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
  2. José Benjamin Falck-Zepeda & Greg Traxler & Robert G. Nelson, 2000. "Surplus Distribution from the Introduction of a Biotechnology Innovation," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(2), pages 360-369.
  3. Hertel, Thomas W. & Terrie Walmsley, 2000. "China's Accession to the WTO: Timing is Everything," GTAP Working Papers 403, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
  4. Anderson, Kym, 2000. "Agriculture's 'multifunctionality' and the WTO," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 44(3), September.
  5. Kyle Bagwell & Robert W. Staiger, 2001. "Domestic Policies, National Sovereignty, And International Economic Institutions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(2), pages 519-562, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Gruere, Guillaume & Bouet, Antoine & Mevel, Simon, 2007. "Genetically modified food and international trade: The case of India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, and the Philippines," IFPRI discussion papers 740, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Huang, Jikun & Hu, Ruifa & van Meijl, Hans & van Tongeren, Frank W., 2003. "Economic Impacts Of Genetically Modified Crops In China," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25883, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  3. Gomez-Barbero, Manuel & Rodgriguez-Cerezo, Emilio, 2005. "Estimate of the Potential Adoption of Genetically Modified Cotton by Farmers in Southern Spain and its Economic Implications," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24556, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  4. van Tongeren, Frank W. & Huang, Jikun, 2004. "China'S Food Economy In The Early 21st Century; Development Of China'S Food Economy And Its Impact On Global Trade And On The Eu," Report Series 29093, Agricultural Economics Research Institute.
  5. Nielsen, Chantal Pohl & Robinson, Sherman & Thierfelder, Karen, 2002. "Trade in genetically modified food," TMD discussion papers 106, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Anderson, Kym, 2004. "Agricultural trade reform and poverty reduction in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3396, The World Bank.
  7. Chang, Ching-Cheng & Hsu, Shih-Hsun & Wu, Chia-Hsuan, 2004. "An Economy-Wide Analysis Of Gm Food Labeling Policies In Taiwan," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 19929, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  8. Antoine Bou�t & Guillaume P. Gru�re, 2011. "Refining Opportunity Cost Estimates of Not Adopting GM Cotton: An Application in Seven Sub-Saharan African Countries," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 33(2), pages 260-279.
  9. Saunders, Caroline M. & Cagatay, Selim, 2003. "Commercial release of first-generation genetically modified food products in New Zealand: using a partial equilibrium trade model to assess the impact on producer returns in New Zealand," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 47(2), June.
  10. Jackson, Lee Ann & Anderson, Kym, 2003. "WHY ARE US AND EU POLICIES TOWARD GMOs SO DIFFERENT?," 2003 Conference (47th), February 12-14, 2003, Fremantle, Australia 57898, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  11. Anderson, Kym, 2003. "Trade Liberalization, Agriculture, and Poverty in Low-income Countries," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  12. Anderson, Kym & Huang, Jikun & Ianchovichina, Elena, 2003. "Long-run impacts of China's WTO accession on farm-nonfarm income inequality and rural poverty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3052, The World Bank.
  13. repec:laf:wpaper:201002 is not listed on IDEAS

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