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Recalibrational Emotions and the Regulation of Trust-Based Behaviors

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  • Eric Schniter

    ()
    (Economic Science Institute, Chapman University)

  • Timothy Shields

    (Economic Science Institute, Chapman University)

Abstract

Though individuals differ in the degree to which they are predisposed to trust or act trustworthy, we theorize that trust-based behaviors are universally determined by the calibration of conflicting short- and long-sighted behavior regulation programs, and that these programs are calibrated by emotions experienced personally and interpersonally. In this chapter we review both the main-stream and evolutionary theories of emotions that philosophers, psychologists, and behavioral economists have based their work on and which can inform our understanding of trust-based behavior regulation. The standard paradigm for understanding emotions is based on mapping their positive and negative affect valence. While Valence Models often expect that the experience of positive and negative affect is interdependent (leading to the popular use of bipolar affect scales), a multivariate “recalibrational” model based on positive, negative, interpersonal, intrapersonal, short-sighted and long-sighted dimensions predicts and recognizes more complex mixed-valence emotional states. We summarize experimental evidence that supports a model of emotionally-calibrated trust regulation and discuss implications for the use of various emotion measures. Finally, in light of these discussions we suggest future directions for the investigation of emotions and trust psychology.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Chapman University, Economic Science Institute in its series Working Papers with number 13-16.

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Length: 66 pages
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:chu:wpaper:13-16

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Related research

Keywords: emotion; affect valence; recalibrational theory; trust game; experiment;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Eric Schniter & Roman M. Sheremeta & Timothy W. Shields, 2013. "Conflicted Emotions Following Trust-based Interaction," Working Papers 13-28, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.

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