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Is teenage motherhood contagious? Evidence from a Natural Experiment

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  • Karin Monstad
  • Carol Propper
  • Kjell G. Salvanes

    ()

Abstract

There is relatively little research on peer effects in teenage motherhood despite the fact that peer effects, and in particular social interaction within the family, are likely to be important. We estimate the impact of an elder sister’s teenage fertility on the teenage childbearing of their younger sister. To identify the peer effect we utilize an educational reform that impacted on the elder sister’s teenage fertility. Our main result is that within families, teen births tend to be contagious and the effect is larger where siblings are close in age and for women from low resource households.

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File URL: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cmpo/publications/papers/2011/wp262.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK in its series The Centre for Market and Public Organisation with number 11/262.

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Length: 15 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:11/262

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Keywords: Teenage pregnancy; spillover effects; education;

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References

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  1. Karin Monstad & Carol Propper & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2008. "Education and Fertility: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 110(4), pages 827-852, December.
  2. Siv Gustafsson, 2001. "Optimal age at motherhood. Theoretical and empirical considerations on postponement of maternity in Europe," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 225-247.
  3. Joshua D. Angrist, 2003. "Treatment Effect Heterogeneity in Theory and Practice," NBER Working Papers 9708, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Justin McCrary & Heather Royer, 2011. "The Effect of Female Education on Fertility and Infant Health: Evidence from School Entry Policies Using Exact Date of Birth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(1), pages 158-95, February.
  5. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2010. "Under Pressure? The Effect of Peers on Outcomes of Young Adults," Working Papers 201024, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  6. Case, A.C. & Katz, L.F., 1991. "The Company You Keep: The Effects Of Family And Neighborhood On Disadvantaged Younths," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1555, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  7. Schelling, Thomas C, 1969. "Models of Segregation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(2), pages 488-93, May.
  8. Hensvik, Lena & Nilsson, Peter, 2010. "Businesses, buddies and babies: social ties and fertility at work," Working Paper Series 2010:9, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  9. Card, David, 1999. "The causal effect of education on earnings," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 30, pages 1801-1863 Elsevier.
  10. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2005. "Why the Apple Doesn't Fall Far: Understanding Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 437-449, March.
  11. Aakvik, Arild & Salvanes, Kjell Gunnar & Vaage, Kjell, 2005. "Educational Attainment and Family Background," Working Papers in Economics 10/05, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
  12. Raaum, Oddbjørn & Salvanes, Kjell G. & Sørensen, Erik Ø., 2003. "The Neighbourhood Is Not What It Used to Be," IZA Discussion Papers 952, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. SandraE. Black & PaulJ. Devereux & KjellG. Salvanes, 2008. "Staying in the Classroom and out of the maternity ward? The effect of compulsory schooling laws on teenage births," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(530), pages 1025-1054, 07.
  14. Hesselius, Patrik & Johansson, Per & Nilsson, Peter, 2009. "Sick of your colleagues' absence?," Working Paper Series 2009:2, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  15. Aakvik, Arild & Salvanes, Kjell G & Vaage, Kjell, 2003. "Measuring Heterogeneity in the Returns to Education in Norway Using Educational Reforms," CEPR Discussion Papers 4088, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  16. Costas Meghir & Mårten Palme, 2003. "Ability, parental background and educational policy: empirical evidence from a social experiment," IFS Working Papers W03/05, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  17. Charles F. Manski & Joram Mayshar, 2003. "Private Incentives and Social Interactions: Fertility Puzzles in Israel," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(1), pages 181-211, 03.
  18. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Isabel Günther & Sebastian Linnemayr, 2008. "Social Interactions and Fertility in Developing Countries," PGDA Working Papers 3408, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
  19. Sandra E. Black & Paul G. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2004. "The More the Merrier? The Effect of Family Composition on Children's Education," NBER Working Papers 10720, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  20. Jones, Andrew M., 1994. "Health, addiction, social interaction and the decision to quit smoking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 93-110, March.
  21. Linda Datcher Loury, 2006. "All in the Extended Family: Effects of Grandparents, Aunts, and Uncles on Educational Attainment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 275-278, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Marcén, Miriam & Bellido, Héctor, 2013. "Teen Mothers and Culture," MPRA Paper 44712, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Dahl, Gordon B. & Løken, Katrine V. & Mogstad, Magne, 2012. "Peer Effects In Program Participation," Working Papers in Economics 12/12, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
  3. Kamila Cygan-Rehm & Regina T. Riphan, 2014. "Teenage Pregnancies and Birth in Germany: Patterns and Developments," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 665, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  4. Kamila Cygan-Rehm & Regina T. Riphahn, 2014. "Teenage Pregnancies and Births in Germany: Patterns and Developments," CESifo Working Paper Series 4836, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Cygan-Rehm, Kamila & Riphahn, Regina T., 2014. "Teenage Pregnancies and Births in Germany: Patterns and Developments," IZA Discussion Papers 8229, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Cygan-Rehm, Kamila & Riphahn, Regina, 2014. "Teenage pregnancies and births in Germany: Patterns and developments," IWQW Discussion Paper Series 05/2014, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institut für Wirtschaftspolitik und Quantitative Wirtschaftsforschung (IWQW).

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