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Monetary policy and asset price bubbles: calibrating the monetary policy trade-offs

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  • Andrew Filardo
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    Abstract

    The issue of monetary policy and asset prices has been receiving much attention not only because it is an interesting topic for macroeconomists but also because central banks have faced daunting challenges from large swings in various types of asset prices. To some extent, the achievement of a low, stable inflation environment has not simultaneously brought about a more stable asset price environment. The record over the past decade, in fact, has raised the prospect of asset price booms and busts as a permanent feature of the monetary policy landscape. This paper lays out a general framework to explore some of the key monetary policy trade-offs presented by asset prices, with particular emphasis on the role of asset price bubbles.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Bank for International Settlements in its series BIS Working Papers with number 155.

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    Length: 37 pages
    Date of creation: Jun 2004
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:bis:biswps:155

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    Keywords: Monetary policy and asset price bubbles: calibrating the monetary policy trade-offs;

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    1. David Gruen & Michael Plumb & Andrew Stone, 2003. "How Should Monetary Policy Respond to Asset-price Bubbles?," RBA Annual Conference Volume, in: Anthony Richards & Tim Robinson (ed.), Asset Prices and Monetary Policy Reserve Bank of Australia.
    2. Ikeda, Shinsuke & Shibata, Akihisa, 1992. "Fundamentals-dependent bubbles in stock prices," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 143-168, October.
    3. Anna Schwartz, 2003. "Asset price inflation and monetary policy," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 31(1), pages 1-14, March.
    4. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2001. "Forecasting output and inflation: the role of asset prices," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Mar.
    5. Bordo, Michael D & Jeanne, Olivier, 2002. "Boom-Busts in Asset Prices, Economic Instability and Monetary Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 3398, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Shiratsuka, Shigenori, 1999. "Asset Price Fluctuation and Price Indices," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 17(3), pages 103-128, December.
    7. J. Bradford De Long & Andrei Shleifer & Lawrence H. Summers & Robert J. Waldmann, . "Noise Trader Risk in Financial Markets," J. Bradford De Long's Working Papers _124, University of California at Berkeley, Economics Department.
    8. Mori, Naruki & Shiratsuka, Shigenori & Taguchi, Hiroo, 2001. "Policy Responses to the Post-bubble Adjustments in Japan: A Tentative Review," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 19(S1), pages 53-102, February.
    9. John B. Taylor, 1999. "Monetary Policy Rules," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number tayl99-1.
    10. Victor Zarnowitz, 1992. "Business Cycles: Theory, History, Indicators, and Forecasting," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number zarn92-1.
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    Cited by:
    1. Kajuth, Florian, 2010. "The role of liquidity constraints in the response of monetary policy to house prices," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 230-242, December.
    2. Fernando Alexandre & Pedro Bação, 2005. "Monetary policy and asset prices: the investment channel," NIPE Working Papers 3/2005, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    3. Pierre L. Siklos & Martin T. Bohl, 2007. "Asset Prices as Indicators of Euro Area Monetary Policy: An Empirical Assessment of Their Role in a Taylor Rule," Working Paper Series 32-07, The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, revised Jul 2007.
    4. Akram, Q. Farooq & Eitrheim, Øyvind, 2008. "Flexible inflation targeting and financial stability: Is it enough to stabilize inflation and output?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1242-1254, July.
    5. Andrew Filardo & Hans Genberg, 2010. "Monetary Policy Strategies in the Asia and Pacific Region : What Way Forward?," Finance Working Papers 23011, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    6. Semmler, Willi & Zhang, Wenlang, 2007. "Asset price volatility and monetary policy rules: A dynamic model and empirical evidence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 411-430, May.
    7. Lee, Dong Jin & Son, Jong Chil, 2013. "Nonlinearity and structural breaks in monetary policy rules with stock prices," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 1-11.
    8. Balazs Egert & Ronald MacDonald, 2006. "Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Transition Economies: Surveying the Surveyable," CESifo Working Paper Series 1739, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Bohl, Martin T. & Siklos, Pierre L., 2005. "The Role of Asset Prices in Euro Area Monetary Policy: Specification and Estimation of Policy Rules and Implications for the European Central Bank," Working Paper Series 2005,6, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), The Postgraduate Research Programme Capital Markets and Finance in the Enlarged Europe.
    10. Grossi, Michele & Tamborini, Roberto, 2011. "Stock prices and monetary policy: Re-examining the issue in a New Keynesian model with endogenous investment," Economics Discussion Papers 2011-54, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
    11. Botzen, W.J. Wouter & Marey, Philip S., 2010. "Did the ECB respond to the stock market before the crisis?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 303-322, May.

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