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Decomposing the Ins and Outs of Cyclical Unemployment

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  • Ronald Bachmann

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  • Mathias Sinning

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Abstract

This paper analyzes the contribution of the socioeconomic and demographic composition of the pool of employed and unemployed individuals to the dynamics of the labor market in different phases of the business cycle. Using individual level data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), we decompose differences in employment status transition rates between economic upswings and downturns into composition effects and behavioral effects. We find that overall composition effects play a minor role for the cyclicality of the unemployment outflow rate, although the contribution of the duration of unemployment is significant. In contrast, composition effects dampen the cyclicality of the unemployment inflow rate considerably. We further observe that the initially positive contribution of composition effects to a higher unemployment outflow rate turns negative over the course of the recession.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics in its series ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics with number 2012-571.

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Length: 30 Pages
Date of creation: Feb 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:acb:cbeeco:2012-571

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Cited by:
  1. Elish Kelly & Seamus McGuinness & Philip O’Connell & David Haugh & Alberto González Pandiella, 2013. "Transitions in and out of Unemployment among Young People in the Irish Recession," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1084, OECD Publishing.

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