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Why is the U.S. Unemployment Rate So Much Lower?

In: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1998, volume 13

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  • Robert Shimer

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This chapter was published in:

  • Ben S. Bernanke & Julio Rotemberg, 1999. "NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1998, volume 13," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number bern99-1, May.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 11245.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:11245

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    Cited by:
    1. Ruge-Murcia, F.J., 2001. "Inflation Targeting Under Asymmetric Preferences," Cahiers de recherche 2001-04, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en économie quantitative, CIREQ.
    2. Alfred Garloff & Carsten Pohl & Norbert Schanne, 2013. "Do small labor market entry cohorts reduce unemployment?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(15), pages 379-406, September.
    3. Nir Jaimovich & Henry E. Siu, 2008. "The Young, the Old, and the Restless: Demographics and Business Cycle Volatility," NBER Working Papers 14063, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Toshihiko Mukoyama & Aysegül Sahin, 2004. "Why did the average duration of unemployment become so much longer?," Staff Reports 194, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    5. Stock, James H. & Watson, Mark W., 1999. "Forecasting inflation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 293-335, October.
    6. Steven J. Davis & R. Jason Faberman & John Haltiwanger & Ron Jarmin & Javier Miranda, 2007. "Business volatility, job destruction and unemployment," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov.
    7. Rob Valletta & Jaclyn Hodges, 2006. "Job matching: evidence from the Beveridge curve," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue apr21.
    8. Alfred Garloff & Carsten Pohl & Norbert Schanne, 2011. "Do smaller labour market entry cohorts really reduce German unemployment?," ERSA conference papers ersa10p658, European Regional Science Association.
    9. Julio J. Rotemberg, 1999. "A Heuristic Method for Extracting Smooth Trends from Economic Time Series," NBER Working Papers 7439, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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