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Here Comes the Rain Again: Weather and the Intertemporal Substitution of Leisure

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  • Marie Connolly

Abstract

I revisit the intertemporal labor supply framework, using exogenous variations in daily weather to see how time at work varies with rain. In my model, a rainy day is associated with a lower enjoyment of leisure, effectively increasing wages and bringing more hours at work. I test the model using data from the American Time Use Survey, supplemented with daily weather. I find that, on rainy days, men shift on average 30 minutes from leisure to work. Computations give a rough estimate of the intertemporal elasticity of labor supply of around 0.01, in line with the rest of the literature.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 26 (2008)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 73-100

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:26:y:2008:p:73-100

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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Cited by:
  1. John Mullahy & Stephanie A. Robert, 2008. "No Time to Lose? Time Constraints and Physical Activity," NBER Working Papers 14513, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Marie Connolly Pray, 2011. "Some Like It Mild and Not Too Wet: the Influence of Weather on Subjective Well-Being," Cahiers de recherche 1116, CIRPEE.
  3. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Caitlin Knowles Myers & Mark L. Pocock, 2006. "Time Zones As Cues For Coordination: Latitude, Longitude, And Letterman," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0609, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  4. Jingye Shi & Mikal Skuterud, 2012. "Gone Fishing! Reported Sickness Absenteeism and the Weather," Working Papers 1208, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2012.
  5. Harley FRAZIS & Jay STEWART, 2012. "How to Think About Time-Use Data : What Inferences Can We Make About Long and Short-Run Time Use from Time Diaries ?," Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, ENSAE, issue 105-106, pages 11.
  6. Stewart, Jay, 2009. "The Timing of Maternal Work and Time with Children," IZA Discussion Papers 4219, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. John Mullahy & Stephanie Robert, 2010. "No time to lose: time constraints and physical activity in the production of health," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 409-432, December.
  8. Jay Stewart & Mary Dorinda Allard, 2008. "How Does Employment Affect the Timing of Time with Children?," Working Papers 419, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  9. Giulio Zanella, 2012. "Allocazione del tempo," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, issue 1, pages 349-390, January-M.
  10. Victoria Vernon, 2010. "Marriage: for love, for money…and for time?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 433-457, December.
  11. Raymond B. Palmquist & Daniel J. Phaneuf & V. Kerry Smith, 2007. "Measuring the Values for Time," NBER Working Papers 13594, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Hamermesh, Daniel S. & Myers, Caitlin Knowles & Pocock, Mark L., 2006. "Cues for Coordination: Light, Longitude and Letterman," IZA Discussion Papers 2060, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Daniel Hamermesh, 2009. "It’s Time to “Do Economics” with Time-Use Data," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 93(1), pages 65-68, August.
  14. C Green & M Navarro Paniagua, 2010. "Does Raising the School Leaving Age Reduce Teacher Effort? A Note from a Policy Experiment," Working Papers 609674, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
  15. Grossbard, Shoshana & Gimenez-Nadal, Jose Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto, 2010. "Racial Discrimination and Household Chores," IZA Discussion Papers 5345, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  16. Fu, Shihe & Viard, Brian, 2014. "Commute Costs and Labor Supply: Evidence from a Satellite Campus," MPRA Paper 53740, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  17. Melissa Dell & Benjamin F. Jones & Benjamin A. Olken, 2013. "What Do We Learn from the Weather? The New Climate-Economy Literature," NBER Working Papers 19578, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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  1. Papers and articles using the American Time Use Survey (ATUS)

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