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Workdays, Workhours, and Work Schedules: Evidence for the United States and Germany

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Author Info

  • Daniel S. Hamermesh

    (University of Texas at Austin)

Abstract

Daniel S. Hamermesh presents the first comprehensive evidence explaining how days of work, hours of work, and daily schedules are determined in the U.S. and Germany. Using an instantaneous approach to looking at unique data sets for each country, Hamermesh provides comparative analyses on factors influencing both employees' and employers' work schedules. This technique allows him to offer a new "snapshot" perspective on work scheduling that clarifies the role of fixed costs of getting to work and of adding workdays to plant schedules.

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File URL: http://research.upjohn.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1076&context=up_bookchapters
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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research in its series Books from Upjohn Press with number www and published in 1996.

ISBN: cloth 9780880991704 paper 9780880991698
Handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:www

Note: PDF is the book's first chapter.
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Related research

Keywords: hours of work; work schedules; time use; childcare; job creation;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Huberman, Michael & Minns, Chris, 2007. "The times they are not changin': Days and hours of work in Old and New Worlds, 1870-2000," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 538-567, October.
  2. Joseph G. Altonji & Emiko Usui, 2005. "Work Hours, Wages, and Vacation Leave," NBER Working Papers 11693, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal & José Varejão, . "Labour Demand Research: Towards a Better Match between Better Theory and Better Data," Working Papers bank_wp, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  4. Gutiérrez-i-Puigarnau, Eva & van Ommeren, Jos N., 2010. "Labour supply and commuting," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 82-89, July.
  5. Jorge González-Chapela, 2007. "On the Price of Recreation Goods as a Determinant of Male Labor Supply," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 795-824.
  6. Drolet, Marie & Morissette, Rene, 1998. "Recent Canadian Evidence on Job Quality by Firm Size," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1998128e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  7. Mueller, Richard E., 2005. "The effect of marital dissolution on the labour supply of males and females: Evidence from Canada," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 787-809, December.
  8. Danielle Venn, 2003. "Non-standard work timing: evidence from the Australian Time Use Survey," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 866, The University of Melbourne.
  9. Uwe Jirjahn & Gesine Stephan, 2004. "Gender, piece rates and wages: evidence from matched employer--employee data," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(5), pages 683-704, September.
  10. Eva Gutierrez-i-Puigarnau & Jos van Ommeren, 2009. "Labour Supply and Commuting: Implications for Optimal Road Taxes," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-008/3, Tinbergen Institute.

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