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European Asylum Policy

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Author Info

  • Timothy J. Hatton

    (Australian National University and University of Essex, tim.hatton@anu.edu.au)

Abstract

Policy towards asylum seekers has been a controversial topic for more than a decade. Rising numbers of asylum applications have been met with ever-tougher policies to deter them. Following a period of policy harmonisation, the EU has reached a crucial stage in the development of a new Common European Asylum System. This paper seeks to shed light on what form this should take. It summarises the development of policy to date and it argues that these policies have been too tough, even from the point of view of EU citizens. Using an economic framework, it examines scenarios with different degrees of policy harmonisation and integration among EU countries. Finally, it argues that there is an important role for enhanced burden-sharing arrangements.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by National Institute of Economic and Social Research in its journal National Institute Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 194 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 106-119

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Handle: RePEc:sae:niesru:v:194:y:2005:i:1:p:106-119

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Related research

Keywords: Asylum seekers; asylum policy; policy coordination;

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References

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  1. R Dur & H.J. Roelfsema, 2004. "Why does centralisation fail to internalise policy externalities?," Working Papers 04-09, Utrecht School of Economics.
  2. Christian Dustmann & Ian Preston, 2004. "Racial and Economic Factors in Attitudes to Immigration," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0401, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  3. Hatton, Timothy J. & Williamson, Jeffrey G, 2005. "Refugees, Asylum Seekers and Policy in Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 5058, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Kevin H. O'Rourke, & Richard Sinnott, 2003. "Migration flows: Political Economy of Migration and the Empirical Challenges," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp06, IIIS.
  5. Eric Neumayer, 2003. "Asylum Recognition Rates in Western Europe - Their Determinants, Variation and Lack of Convergence," Labor and Demography 0312004, EconWPA, revised 02 Sep 2004.
  6. Rotte, Ralph & Vogler, Michael & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1997. "South-North Refugee Migration: Lessons for Development Cooperation," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 1(1), pages 99-115, February.
  7. Besley, Timothy & Coate, Stephen, 2003. "Centralized versus decentralized provision of local public goods: a political economy approach," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(12), pages 2611-2637, December.
  8. Eric Neumayer, 2003. "Bogus Refugees? The Determinants of Asylum Migration to Western Europe," Labor and Demography 0311002, EconWPA, revised 18 Feb 2004.
  9. Dustmann, Christian & Preston, Ian, 2001. "Attitudes to Ethic Minorities, Ethnic Context and Location Decisions," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(470), pages 353-73, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. TimothyJ. Hatton, 2009. "The Rise and Fall of Asylum: What Happened and Why?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(535), pages F183-F213, 02.
  2. Hatton, Timothy J., 2012. "Refugee and Asylum Migration to the OECD: A Short Overview," IZA Discussion Papers 7004, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Mathias Czaika, 2009. "The Political Economy of Refugee Migration," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 229(6), pages 803-821, December.
  4. Francesc Ortega & Giovanni Peri, 2012. "The Role of Income and Immigration Policies in Attracting International Migrants," Working Papers 1214, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.

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