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Do Austrian men and women become more equal? At least in terms of labour supply!

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  • Georg Wernhart
  • Rudolf Winter-Ebmer

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Abstract

We study the development of wage elasticity of labor supply for Austrian men and women over time using comparable and representative survey data for the 1980s and 1990s. The elasticity of men is relatively low and constant over time, similar to the behavior of single women. Most remarkable is the almost continuous reduction in the labor supply reactions of married women: while their elasticity was still several times larger at the beginning of the 1980s, they approached rapidly the much less elastic behaviour of men. These developments are important for the analysis of deadweight losses of taxation as well as the effects of tax reforms and wage subsidy programs.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10663-010-9154-z
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Empirica.

Volume (Year): 39 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 45-64

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Handle: RePEc:kap:empiri:v:39:y:2012:i:1:p:45-64

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100261

Related research

Keywords: Labour supply; Gender; Wage elasticity; J21; J22;

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References

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  1. Alberto Alesina & Andrea Ichino & Loukas Karabarbounis, 2011. "Gender-Based Taxation and the Division of Family Chores," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 1-40, May.
  2. Emilia Del Bono & Andrea Weber & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2008. "Clash of Career and Family: Fertility Decisions after Job Displacement," CESifo Working Paper Series 2180, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Nicole M Fortin, 2005. "Gender Role Attitudes and the Labour-market Outcomes of Women across OECD Countries," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(3), pages 416-438, Autumn.
  4. Helene Dearing & Helmut Hofer & Christine Lietz & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer & Katharina Wrohlich, 2007. "Why are mothers working longer hours in Austria than in Germany? A comparative micro simulation analysis," Economics working papers 2007-11, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  5. Fersterer, Josef & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 1999. "Are Austrian Returns to Education Falling Over Time?," IZA Discussion Papers 72, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Florence Jaumotte, 2003. "Female Labour Force Participation: Past Trends and Main Determinants in OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 376, OECD Publishing.
  7. Schönberg, Uta & Ludsteck, Johannes, 2007. "Maternity Leave Legislation, Female Labor Supply, and the Family Wage Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 2699, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Joshua Angrist, 1988. "Grouped Data Estimation and Testing in Simple Labor Supply Models," Working Papers 614, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  9. David Blau & Philip Robins, 1991. "Child care demand and labor supply of young mothers over time," Demography, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 333-351, August.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Rudolf Winter-Ebmer & Mario Schnalzenberger & Nicole Schneeweis & Martina Zweimüller, 2011. "Job Quality and Employment of Older People in Europe," NRN working papers 2011-05, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  2. Tibor Hanappi & Sandra Müllbacher, 2012. "Tax Incentives and Family Labor Supply in Austria," NRN working papers 2012-12, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.

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