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Why Do Recent Graduates Enter into Flexible Jobs?

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  • Daniëlle Bertrand-Cloodt
  • Frank Cörvers

    ()

  • Ben Kriechel
  • Jesper Thor

Abstract

The share of flexible jobs on the Dutch labour market is among the highest in Western countries,in particular for recent graduates. In this study we examine why recent graduates enter intotemporary contracts and whether flexible jobs match their qualifications worse than permanent jobsdo. Graduates that enter into flexible jobs face large wage penalties, a worse job match and lesstraining participation than those entering into permanent jobs, even after correcting for abilitydifferences. When the labour market situation for a particular field of education deteriorates, alarger share of recent graduates is forced into flexible jobs, which may threaten their positionon the labour market in the long run. Flexible work among graduates is unrelated to theirwillingness to take risks. Only for university graduates are there any indications that flexiblejobs may provide stepping stones to permanent jobs.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal De Economist.

Volume (Year): 160 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 157-175

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Handle: RePEc:kap:decono:v:160:y:2012:i:2:p:157-175

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100260

Related research

Keywords: Flexible work; Job characteristics; Job mismatch; Temporary contracts; Recent graduates; Willingness to take risks; J21; J24; J41; M51;

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  1. Zijl, Marloes & van den Berg, Gerard J. & Heyma, Arjan, 2004. "Stepping Stones for the Unemployed: The Effect of Temporary Jobs on the Duration until Regular Work," IZA Discussion Papers 1241, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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