Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Los determinantes socioeconómicos de la demanda de Educación Superior en España y la movilidad educativa intergeneracional

Contents:

Author Info

  • María Gil Izquierdo

    ()
    (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

  • Laura de Pablos Escobar

    ()
    (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

  • María Martínez Torres

    ()
    (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

Abstract

This paper has a two-folded aim: the determinants of Higher Education demand and the intergenerational educational mobility will be analyzed. As database, the EU-SILC (2005) is proposed. Educational demand function is estimated with a dogit model, while educational mobility is approached by using mobility indexes and transition matrix. Main results, referring to Higher Education demand, show a positive and significant impact on demand of mothers’ attained educational level and gender issues, as long as the presence of children and un-employed in a household has a negative influence. On the other hand, and related to mobility, for the Spanish case, children are more likely to attain higher levels of education than their parents. Besides, parents attaining the highest education level is a strong determinant of their children educational level.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.ief.es/documentos/recursos/publicaciones/revistas/hac_pub/193_Art_3.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by IEF in its journal Hacienda Pública Española/Revista de Economía Pública.

Volume (Year): 193 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 75-108

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:hpe:journl:y:2010:v:193:i:2:p:75-108

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Avda. Cardenal Herrera Oria, 378, 28035 Madrid
Phone: 91-339.89.15
Fax: 91-339.89.64
Email:
Web page: http://www.ief.es
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Higher Education demand; dogit model; intergenerational educational mobility.;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Fields, Gary S. & Ok, Efe A., 1996. "The Meaning and Measurement of Income Mobility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 349-377, November.
  2. Checchi, Daniele & Ichino, Andrea & Rustichini, Aldo, 1999. "More equal but less mobile?: Education financing and intergenerational mobility in Italy and in the US," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 351-393, December.
  3. Gary S. Becker, 1975. "Investment in Human Capital: Effects on Earnings," NBER Chapters, in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis, with Special Reference to Education, 2nd ed., pages 13-44 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Cecilia Albert Verdú, 1998. "- Higher Education Demand In Spain: The Influence Of Labour Market Signals And Family Background," Working Papers. Serie EC 1998-17, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  5. Olga Cantó-Sánchez, . "Income mobility in Spain: How much is there," Studies on the Spanish Economy 17, FEDEA.
  6. Jere R. Behrman & Alejandro Gaviria & Miguel Székely, 2001. "Intergenerational Mobility in Latin America," IDB Publications 6485, Inter-American Development Bank.
  7. Gary S. Becker, 1994. "Investment in Human Capital: Rates of Return," NBER Chapters, in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 59-160 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Petrongolo, Barbara & San Segundo, Maria J., 2002. "Staying-on at school at 16: the impact of labor market conditions in Spain," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 353-365, August.
  9. Adriana Sánchez Hugalde, 2004. "Movilidad intergeneracional de ingresos y educativa en España (1980-90)," Working Papers 2004/1, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  10. A. B. Atkinson, 1981. "On Intergenerational Income Mobility in Britain," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 3(2), pages 194-218, January.
  11. Gary S. Becker & Nigel Tomes, 1994. "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," NBER Chapters, in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 257-298 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Gary S. Becker, 1975. "Age, Earnings, Wealth, and Human Capital," NBER Chapters, in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis, with Special Reference to Education, 2nd ed., pages 214-230 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Cragg, John G, 1971. "Some Statistical Models for Limited Dependent Variables with Application to the Demand for Durable Goods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 39(5), pages 829-44, September.
  14. Robert Erikson & John H. Goldthorpe, 2002. "Intergenerational Inequality: A Sociological Perspective," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 31-44, Summer.
  15. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  16. Daniele Checchi, 1997. "Education and Intergenerational Mobility in Occupations," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 66(1), pages 136-144.
  17. Simona Comi, 2004. "Intergenerational mobility in Europe: evidence from ECHP," CHILD Working Papers wp18_04, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
  18. Bratberg, Espen & Nilsen, Øivind Anti & Vaage, Kjell, 2002. "Assessing Changes in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility," Working Papers in Economics 26/02, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
  19. Zimmerman, David J, 1992. "Regression toward Mediocrity in Economic Stature," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 409-29, June.
  20. Dahan, Momi & Gaviria, Alejandro, 2001. "Sibling Correlations and Intergenerational Mobility in Latin America," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(3), pages 537-54, April.
  21. Thomas, D., 1991. "Like Father, Like Son: Gender Differences In Household Resource Allocations," Papers 619, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  22. Behrman, Jere R & Taubman, Paul, 1989. "Is Schooling "Mostly in the Genes"? Nature-N urture Decomposition Using Data on Relatives," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1425-46, December.
  23. Solon, Gary, 1992. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 393-408, June.
  24. Ainhoa Herrarte Sánchez & Eva Medina Moral & José Vicéns Otero, 2007. "Cambios en la situación laboral de la población española ante el incremento de la inmigración," EKONOMIAZ, Gobierno Vasco / Eusko Jaurlaritza / Basque Government, vol. 66(03), pages 330-349.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hpe:journl:y:2010:v:193:i:2:p:75-108. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Olga Cantó Sánchez) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Olga Cantó Sánchez to update the entry or send us the correct address.

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.