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From Policy Aims and Small-farm Characteristics to Farm Science Needs

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  • Lipton, Michael

Abstract

Summary This paper examines the agricultural science needs of small farms. The green revolution successfully negotiated two tightropes: agricultural productivity increases were larger than the fall in prices that resulted from producing more food; and output per hectare rose faster than output per worker, thus increasing the demand for labor. The current challenge is to generate technology that helps poor farmers in low potential areas. Since research capacity is increasingly private, incentives to produce the needed technology are needed, perhaps through contracts to produce varieties with specific characteristics. Development of seeds needs complementary work on water, for which economists, plant scientists, and engineers need to pool their skills.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 38 (2010)
Issue (Month): 10 (October)
Pages: 1399-1412

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:38:y:2010:i:10:p:1399-1412

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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Keywords: small farms seeds irrigation green revolution;

References

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  1. Heltberg, Rasmus, 1998. "Rural market imperfections and the farm size-- productivity relationship: Evidence from Pakistan," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(10), pages 1807-1826, October.
  2. Rosenzweig, Mark R. & Binswanger, Hans P., 1992. "Wealth, weather risk, and the composition and profitability of agricultural investments," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1055, The World Bank.
  3. Thomas Reardon & C. Peter Timmer & Christopher B. Barrett & Julio Berdegué, 2003. "The Rise of Supermarkets in Africa, Asia, and Latin America," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1140-1146.
  4. Barrett, Christopher B., 1996. "On price risk and the inverse farm size-productivity relationship," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 193-215, December.
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  6. Hossain, Mahabub, 1988. "Nature and impact of the Green Revolution in Bangladesh:," Research reports 67, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Dinghuan Hu & Thomas Reardon & Scott Rozelle & Peter Timmer & Honglin Wang, 2004. "The Emergence of Supermarkets with Chinese Characteristics: Challenges and Opportunities for China's Agricultural Development," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 22, pages 557-586, 09.
  8. Michael Lipton & Qi Zhang, 2007. "Reducing Inequality And Poverty During Liberalisation In China: Rural And Agricultural Experiences And Policy Options," PRUS Working Papers 37, Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex.
  9. Mundlak, Yair, 2001. "Production and supply," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 3-85 Elsevier.
  10. Assuncao, Juliano J. & Ghatak, Maitreesh, 2003. "Can unobserved heterogeneity in farmer ability explain the inverse relationship between farm size and productivity," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 189-194, August.
  11. Andrew Dorward, 1999. "Farm size and productivity in Malawian smallholder agriculture," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(5), pages 141-161.
  12. Frisvold, George B., 1994. "Does supervision matter? Some hypothesis tests using Indian farm-level data," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 217-238, April.
  13. Fan, Shenngen & Hazell, Peter & Haque, T., 2000. "Targeting public investments by agro-ecological zone to achieve growth and poverty alleviation goals in rural India," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 411-428, August.
  14. Birdsall, Nancy & Ross, David & Sabot, Richard, 1995. "Inequality and Growth Reconsidered: Lessons from East Asia," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 9(3), pages 477-508, September.
  15. Russell L. Lamb, 1997. "Inverse productivity : land quality, labor markets, and risk," Research Working Paper 97-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
  16. Bhalla, Surjit S & Roy, Prannoy L, 1988. "Mis-specification in Farm Productivity Analysis: The Role of Land Quality," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(1), pages 55-73, March.
  17. Lamb, Russell L., 2003. "Inverse productivity: land quality, labor markets, and measurement error," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 71-95, June.
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Cited by:
  1. Verschelde, Marijn & D'Haese, Marijke F.C. & Vandamme, Ellen & Rayp, Glenn, 2011. "Challenging Small-scale Farming, A Non-parametric Analysis of the (Inverse) Relationship Between Farm Productivity and Farm Size in Burundi," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 115550, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  2. Letty, Brigid & Shezi, Zanele & Mudhara, Maxwell, 2012. "An exploration of agricultural grassroots innovation in South Africa and implications for innovation indicator development," MERIT Working Papers 023, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  3. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Jayne, T. S., 2014. "Poverty Reduction Potential of Increasing Smallholder Access to Land," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 171873, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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