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The family farm in a globalizing world: the role of crop science in alleviating poverty

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  • Lipton, Michael

Abstract

"The topic of family farms has been gaining prominence in the academic, policy, and donor communities in recent years. Small farms dominate the agricultural landscape in the developing world, providing the largest source of employment and income to the rural poor, yet smallholders remain highly susceptible to poverty and hunger. With the advance of globalization and greater integration of agricultural markets, the need for increases in agricultural productivity for family farms is particularly pressing. Raising productivity and output of small farmers would not only increase their incomes and food security, but also stimulate the rest of the economy and contribute to broad-based food security and poverty alleviation. In this paper, Michael Lipton builds an argument for greater focus on pro-smallholder crop science as a key solution to generate increases in productivity and income. Increasing the levels of investment into agricultural technology, improving water and land use and distribution, and creating positive incentives for developing-country farmers come to the forefront of the paper as critical steps that must be taken to ensure massive reduction in global poverty. Favorable demographic trends over the next few decades provide a window of opportunity for reforms and action that must not be squandered." From Foreword by Joachim von Braun

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series 2020 vision discussion papers with number 40.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:2020dp:40

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Keywords: Globalization; Poverty alleviation Developing countries; Rural poor; Agricultural productivity; Agricultural technology; Small farmers; Crop science;

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  1. Lockheed, Marlaine E & Jamison, Dean T & Lau, Lawrence J, 1987. "Farmer Education and Farm Efficiency: Reply," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(3), pages 643-44, April.
  2. Alston, Julian M. & Wyatt, T. J. & Pardey, Philip G. & Marra, Michele C. & Chan-Kang, Connie, 2000. "A meta-analysis of rates of return to agricultural R & D: ex pede Herculem?," Research reports 113, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Lipton, Michael & Ravallion, Martin, 1995. "Poverty and policy," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 41, pages 2551-2657 Elsevier.
  4. Maurice Schiff & Alberto Valdes, 1994. "The Plundering of Agriculture in Developing Countries," Reports _013, World Bank Latin America and the Caribean Region Department.
  5. Binswanger, Hans P. & Deininger, Klaus & Feder, Gershon, 1993. "Power, distortions, revolt, and reform in agricultural land relations," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1164, The World Bank.
  6. Fan, Shenggen & Zhang, Linxiu & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2000. "Growth and poverty in rural China: the role of public investments," EPTD discussion papers 66, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Fan, Shenngen & Hazell, Peter & Haque, T., 2000. "Targeting public investments by agro-ecological zone to achieve growth and poverty alleviation goals in rural India," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 411-428, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Beyene, Fekadu & Muche, Mequanent, 0. "Determinants of Food Security among Rural Households of Central Ethiopia: An Empirical Analysis," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universit├Ąt zu Berlin, vol. 49.
  2. Sofia Naranjo, 2012. "Enabling food sovereignty and a prosperous future for peasants by understanding the factors that marginalise peasants and lead to poverty and hunger," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 231-246, June.
  3. Fischer, R.A. & Byerlee, Derek R. & Edmeades, Gregory O., 2009. "Can Technology Deliver on the Yield Challenge to 2050?," Miscellaneous Papers 55481, Agecon Search.
  4. Haggblade, Steven, 2007. "Returns to Investment in Agriculture," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 54625, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  5. Chris Funk & Molly Brown, 2009. "Declining global per capita agricultural production and warming oceans threaten food security," The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 271-289, September.
  6. Sukhpal Singh, 2013. "Governance and upgrading in export grape global production networks in India," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series ctg-2013-33, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
  7. Arindam Samaddar & Prabir Das, 2008. "Changes in transition: technology adoption and rice farming in two Indian villages," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer, vol. 25(4), pages 541-553, December.

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