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Occupational gender segregation Trends and explanations

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  • Preston, Jo Anne
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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W5X-3Y9GB4R-3/2/c79f58b0a6a5dadad227793d1e59dd97
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance.

    Volume (Year): 39 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 5 ()
    Pages: 611-624

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:39:y:1999:i:5:p:611-624

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620167

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    References

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    1. Phelps, Edmund S, 1972. "The Statistical Theory of Racism and Sexism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 659-61, September.
    2. Elaine Sorensen, 1989. "Measuring the pay disparity between typically female occupations and other jobs: A bivariate selectivity approach," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 42(4), pages 624-639, July.
    3. Martin Watts, 1995. "Divergent Trends in Gender Segregation by Occupation in the United States: 1970-92," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 17(3), pages 357-379, April.
    4. O'Neill, June & Polachek, Solomon, 1993. "Why the Gender Gap in Wages Narrowed in the 1980s," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 205-28, January.
    5. Paula England, 1982. "The Failure of Human Capital Theory to Explain Occupational Sex Segregation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(3), pages 358-370.
    6. Andrea H. Beller, 1982. "Occupational Segregation by Sex: Determinants and Changes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(3), pages 371-392.
    7. Duncan, Greg J & Hoffman, Saul, 1979. "On-the-Job Training and Earnings Differences by Race and Sex," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 61(4), pages 594-603, November.
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    Cited by:
    1. Ricardo Mora & Javier Ruiz-Castillo, 2003. "Additively Decomposable Segregation Indexes. The Case of Gender Segregation by Occupations and Human Capital Levels in Spain," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 147-179, August.
    2. World Bank, 2012. "A Gender (R)evolution in the Making? Expanding Women's Economic Opportunities in Central America : A Decade in Review," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12468, The World Bank.
    3. Raquel Vale Mendes, 2005. "Occupational segregation and the Portuguese gender wage gap," ERSA conference papers ersa05p130, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Joy, Lois, 2006. "Occupational differences between recent male and female college graduates," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 221-231, April.
    5. repec:idb:brikps:52858 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Paul E. Gabriel & Susanne Schmitz, 2014. "A longitudinal examination of racial differences in occupational distributions among prime-aged males in the United States," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(1), pages 106-114.
    7. Thomas DeLeire & Helen Levy, 2001. "Gender, Occupation Choice and the Risk of Death at Work," Working Papers 0122, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
    8. Raquel Vale Mendes, 2009. "Gender wage differentials and occupational distribution," Notas Económicas, Faculdade de Economia, Universidade de Coimbra, issue 29, pages 26-40, June.
    9. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2008. "Occupational and industrial segregation of female and male workers in Spain: An alternative approach," Working Papers 84, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    10. Raquel Vale Mendes, 2004. "Decomposition of gender wage differentials among Portuguese top management jobs," ERSA conference papers ersa04p127, European Regional Science Association.

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