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Occupational Segregation by Sex: Determinants and Changes

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  • Andrea H. Beller
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    Abstract

    The human capital and discrimination explanations of occupational segregation are tested in this paper. The empirical evidence is mixed on the supply-oriented human capital explanation, but it supports the demand-oriented discrimination explanation. The enforcement of federal equal employment opportunity (EEO) programs measures discrimination indirectly. Findings show that between 1967 and 1974, both Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the federal contract compliance program increased a working woman's probability of being employed in a male occupation relative to a man's probability. This success of EEO laws suggests that discrimination was a determinant of occupational segregation originally.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

    Volume (Year): 17 (1982)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 371-392

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:17:y:1982:i:3:p:371-392

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    Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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    Cited by:
    1. Görlich Dennis & Grip Andries de, 2007. "Human Capital Depreciation during Family-related Career Interruptions in Male and Female Occupations," ROA Research Memorandum, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA) 007, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    2. repec:fth:prinin:353 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Hélène Périvier, 2008. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux États-Unis," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE) 2008-12, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    4. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/6142 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Francine D. Blau & Patricia Simpson & Deborah Anderson, 1998. "Continuing Progress? Trends in Occupational Segregation in the United States Over the 1970s and 1980s," NBER Working Papers 6716, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Marco van der Leij & Sebastian Buhai, 2010. "A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation," 2010 Meeting Papers, Society for Economic Dynamics 554, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Hélène Perivier, 2007. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux États-Unis - Une mise en perspective avec la France et la Suède," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE) 2007-07, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    8. Mark R. Killingsworth, 2002. "Comparable Worth and Pay Equity: Recent Developments in the United States," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, University of Toronto Press, vol. 28(s1), pages 171-186, May.
    9. Borghans, Lex & Groot, Loek, 1999. "Educational presorting and occupational segregation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 375-395, September.
    10. Hélène Périvier-Timbeau, 2007. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux Etats-Unis: une mise en perspective avec la France et la Suède," Sciences Po publications, Sciences Po 2007-07, Sciences Po.
    11. Preston, Jo Anne, 1999. "Occupational gender segregation Trends and explanations," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 611-624.
    12. Neumark, David, 1996. "Sex Discrimination in Restaurant Hiring: An Audit Study," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 111(3), pages 915-41, August.
    13. Borghans,L. & Groot,L., 1999. "Educational presorting as a cause of occupational segregation," ROA Research Memorandum, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA) 003, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    14. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/1203 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. M. Melinda Pitts, 2002. "Why choose women's work if it pays less? A structural model of occupational choice," Working Paper, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta 2002-30, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    16. Barbezat D, 1993. "Occupational segmentation by sex in the world," ILO Working Papers, International Labour Organization 298900, International Labour Organization.
    17. repec:dgr:uvatin:2006016 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Hélène Périvier-Timbeau, 2008. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux Etats-Unis," Sciences Po publications, Sciences Po 2008-12, Sciences Po.

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