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The power of conventions: A theory of social preferences

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  • Li, Jing

Abstract

People often act as if they care about others' welfare as well as their own (i.e. have "social preferences"). One plausible assumption is that people have preferences for social implications of their actions, determined by exogenous "conventions", in addition to the material consequences of actions. I construct games with conventions using the psychological games framework developed in Geanakoplos et al. [Geanakoplos, J., Pearce, D., Stacchetti, E., 1989. Psychological games and sequential rationality. Games and Economic Behavior 1, 60-79]. With a notion of distributional convention combining efficiency and fairness, I show equilibrium behavior reflects social preferences. The model yields tight and testable predictions consistent with a large body of experimental results, is parsimonious, and is suggestive of further studies, both experimentally and theoretically.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 65 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3-4 (March)
Pages: 489-505

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:65:y:2008:i:3-4:p:489-505

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Cited by:
  1. Pierpaolo Battigalli & Martin Dufwenberg, 2005. "Dynamic Psychological Games," Working Papers 287, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  2. Felix Bierbrauer & Nick Netzer, 2012. "Mechanism Design and Intentions," Working Paper Series in Economics, University of Cologne, Department of Economics 53, University of Cologne, Department of Economics, revised 21 Aug 2012.

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