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A behavioral justification for escalating punishment schemes

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  • Mungan, Murat C.
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    Abstract

    The standard two-period law enforcement model is considered in a setting where individuals usually, but not exclusively, commit crimes only after comparing expected costs and benefits. Where escalating punishment schemes are present, there is an inherent value in keeping a clean criminal record; a person with a record may unintentionally become a repeat offender if he fails to exert self-control, and be punished more severely. If the punishment for repeat offenders is sufficiently high, one may rationally forgo the opportunity of committing a profitable crime today to avoid being sanctioned as a repeat offender in the future. Therefore, partial deterrence can be achieved at a very low cost through the use of escalating penalties, providing a behavioral justification for punishing repeat offenders more severely.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal International Review of Law and Economics.

    Volume (Year): 37 (2014)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 189-197

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:irlaec:v:37:y:2014:i:c:p:189-197

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/irle

    Related research

    Keywords: D03; K00; K10; K14; K40; K42; Lapse; Weak-will; Recidivism; Repeat offenders; Law enforcement; Deterrence; Escalating penalties;

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    References

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    18. Mungan, Murat C., 2010. "Repeat offenders: If they learn, we punish them more severely," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 173-177, June.
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