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The impact of piped water provision on infant mortality in Brazil: A quantile panel data approach

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  • Gamper-Rabindran, Shanti
  • Khan, Shakeeb
  • Timmins, Christopher
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    Abstract

    We examine the impact of piped water on the under-1 infant mortality rate (IMR) in Brazil using a recently developed econometric procedure for the estimation of quantile treatment effects with panel data. The provision of piped water in Brazil is highly correlated with other observable and unobservable determinants of IMR -- the latter leading to an important source of bias. Instruments for piped water provision are not readily available, and fixed effects to control for time-invariant correlated unobservables are invalid in the simple quantile regression framework. Using the quantile panel data procedure in Chen and Khan [Chen, S., Khan, S., Semiparametric estimation of non-stationary censored panel model data models with time-varying factor. Econometric Theory 2007; forthcoming], our estimates indicate that the provision of piped water reduces infant mortality by significantly more at the higher conditional quantiles of the IMR distribution than at the lower conditional quantiles (except for cases of extreme underdevelopment). These results imply that targeting piped water intervention toward areas in the upper quantiles of the conditional IMR distribution, when accompanied by other basic public health inputs, can achieve significantly greater reductions in infant mortality.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Development Economics.

    Volume (Year): 92 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2 (July)
    Pages: 188-200

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:92:y:2010:i:2:p:188-200

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/devec

    Related research

    Keywords: Infant mortality Piped water supply Quantile regression with panel data Heterogenous program impact Distribution of public goods;

    References

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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. Masayoshi Hayashi, 2011. "The Effects of Medical Factors on Transfer Deficits in Public Assistance in Japan: A Quantile Regression Analysis," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-816, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    2. David Powell & Joachim Wagner, 2010. "The Exporter Productivity Premium along the Productivity Distribution: First Evidence from a Quantile Regression Approach for Fixed Effects Panel Data Models," Working Paper Series in Economics 182, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
    3. Zacharias Ziegelhöfer, 2012. "Down with diarrhea - Using fuzzy Regression Discontinuity Design to link communal water supply with health," IHEID Working Papers 05-2012, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    4. Kosec, Katrina, 2013. "The child health implications of privatizing Africa’s urban water supply:," IFPRI discussion papers 1269, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Joachim Wagner, 2011. "From Estimation Results to Stylized Facts Twelve Recommendations for Empirical Research in International Activities of Heterogeneous Firms," De Economist, Springer, vol. 159(4), pages 389-412, December.
    6. Barde, Julia Alexa & Julia Alexa, Barde & Juliana, Walkiewicz, 2013. "The Impact of Access to Piped Drinking Water on Human Capital Formation - Evidence from Brasilian Primary Schools," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79808, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Florencia DEVOTO & Esther DUFLO & Pascaline DUPAS & William PARIENTE & Vincent PONS, 2011. "Happiness on Tap: Piped Water Adoption in Urban Morocco," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2011013, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    8. Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "Do Fertilizer Subsidies Boost Staple Crop Production and Reduce Poverty Across the Distribution of Smallholders in Africa? Quantile Regression Results from Malawi," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126742, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Higuchi, Katsuhiko & Suhaeti, Rita Nur, 2009. "Impacts of prenatal and environmental factors on child growth: Evidence from Indonesia," IFPRI discussion papers 933, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Onjala, Joseph & Ndiritu, Simon Wagura & Stage, Jesper, 2013. "Risk Perception, Choice of Drinking Water, and Water Treatment: Evidence from Kenyan Towns," Discussion Papers dp-13-10-efd, Resources For the Future.
    11. Boonperm, Jirawan & Haughton, Jonathan & Khandker, Shahidur R., 2013. "Does the Village Fund matter in Thailand? Evaluating the impact on incomes and spending," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 3-16.
    12. Stephan Klasen & Tobias Lechtenfeld & Kristina Meier & Johannes Rieckmann, 2012. "Benefits trickling away: the health impact of extending access to piped water and sanitation in urban Yemen," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(4), pages 537-565, December.
    13. Nguyen Viet, Cuong, 2011. "Does Piped Water Improve Household Welfare? Evidence from Vietnam," MPRA Paper 40776, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Tobias Lechtenfeld, 2012. "Why does piped water not reduce diarrhea for children? Evidence from urban Yemen," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 119, Courant Research Centre PEG.

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