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The Impact of Piped Water Provision on Infant Mortality in Brazil: A Quantile Panel Data Approach

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  • Shanti Gamper-Rabindran
  • Shakeeb Khan
  • Christopher Timmins
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    Abstract

    We examine the impact of piped water on the under-1 infant mortality rate (IMR) in Brazil using a novel econometric procedure for the estimation of quantile treatment effects with panel data. The provision of piped water in Brazil is highly correlated with other observable and unobservable determinants of IMR - the latter leading to an important source of bias. Instruments for piped water provision are not readily available, and fixed effects to control for time invariant correlated unobservables are invalid in the simple quantile regression framework. Using the quantile panel data procedure in Chen and Khan (2007), our estimates indicate that the provision of piped water reduces infant mortality by significantly more at the higher conditional quantiles of the IMR distribution than at the lower conditional quantiles (except for cases of extreme underdevelopment). These results imply that targeting piped water intervention in areas with higher conditional quantiles of the IMR, when accompanied by other basic public health inputs, can achieve significantly greater reductions in infant mortality.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Duke University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 10-04.

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    Length: 52
    Date of creation: 2010
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:duk:dukeec:10-04

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    Postal: Department of Economics Duke University 213 Social Sciences Building Box 90097 Durham, NC 27708-0097
    Phone: (919) 660-1800
    Fax: (919) 684-8974
    Web page: http://econ.duke.edu/

    Related research

    Keywords: Infant mortality; piped water supply; quantile with panel data; heterogenous program impact; distribution of public goods;

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    Cited by:
    1. Stephan Klasen & Tobias Lechtenfeld & Kristina Meier & Johannes Rieckmann, 2012. "Benefits trickling away: The health impact of extending access to piped water and sanitation in urban Yemen," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 110, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    2. Edward L. Glaeser, 2012. "Urban Public Finance," NBER Working Papers 18244, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Kosec, Katrina, 2013. "The child health implications of privatizing Africa’s urban water supply:," IFPRI discussion papers 1269, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Boonperm, Jirawan & Haughton, Jonathan & Khandker, Shahidur R., 2013. "Does the Village Fund matter in Thailand? Evaluating the impact on incomes and spending," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 3-16.
    5. Zacharias Ziegelhöfer, 2012. "Down with diarrhea - Using fuzzy Regression Discontinuity Design to link communal water supply with health," IHEID Working Papers 05-2012, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    6. Onjala, Joseph & Ndiritu, Simon Wagura & Stage, Jesper, 2013. "Risk Perception, Choice of Drinking Water, and Water Treatment: Evidence from Kenyan Towns," Discussion Papers dp-13-10-efd, Resources For the Future.
    7. Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner, 2011. "Automatic Grade Promotion and Student Performance: Evidence from Brazil," Discussion Papers in Economics 11/52, Department of Economics, University of Leicester, revised Sep 2013.
    8. Masayoshi Hayashi, 2011. "The Effects of Medical Factors on Transfer Deficits in Public Assistance in Japan: A Quantile Regression Analysis," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-816, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    9. Tobias Lechtenfeld, 2012. "Why does piped water not reduce diarrhea for children? Evidence from urban Yemen," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 119, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    10. Barde, Julia Alexa & Walkiewicz, Juliana, 2013. "The Impact of Access to Piped Drinking Water on Human Capital Formation - Evidence from Brasilian Primary Schools," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79808, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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