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The effect of water and sanitation on child mortality in Egypt

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  • Abou-Ali, Hala

    (Department of Economics, School of Economics and Commercial Law, Göteborg University)

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    Abstract

    This paper assesses water and sanitation’s impacts on child mortality in Egypt. The analysis is conducted using a three-part model specification, comprising discrete choice to model the child prospects of dying during the neonatal period. The remaining parts uses transition models to model infant and childhood risk of death where unobserved heterogeneity is accounted for. The results show that access to municipal water decreases the risk and sanitation is found to have a more pronounced impact on mortality than water. The results suggest that increasing awareness of the Egyptian population relative to health care and hygiene is an important feature to decrease child’s mortality risk. Moreover, gender discrimination is found to be of an important effect beyond the neonatal period.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/2828
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 112.

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    Length: 29 pages
    Date of creation: 15 Oct 2003
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0112

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    Postal: Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Box 640, SE 405 30 GÖTEBORG, Sweden
    Phone: 031-773 10 00
    Web page: http://www.handels.gu.se/econ/
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    Related research

    Keywords: Child mortality; Household environment; Transition models; Unobserved heterogeneity; Middle East; Egypt;

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    1. Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1984. "An Estimable Dynamic Stochastic Model of Fertility and Child Mortality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 92(5), pages 852-74, October.
    2. Olsen, Randall J & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1983. "The Impact of Exogenous Child Mortality on Fertility: A Waiting Time Regression with Dynamic Regressors," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 51(3), pages 731-49, May.
    3. Aly, Hassan Y. & Grabowski, Richard, 1990. "Education and child mortality in Egypt," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 733-742, May.
    4. Guilkey, David K. & Riphahn, Regina T., 1998. "The determinants of child mortality in the Philippines: estimation of a structural model," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 281-305, August.
    5. Lee, Lung-fei & Rosenzweig, Mark R. & Pitt, Mark M., 1997. "The effects of improved nutrition, sanitation, and water quality on child health in high-mortality populations," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 209-235, March.
    6. Flinn, C. & Heckman, J., 1982. "New methods for analyzing structural models of labor force dynamics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 115-168, January.
    7. Ridder, G. & Tunali, I., 1997. "Stratified Partial Likelihood Estimation," Papers, Koc University 1997/17, Koc University.
    8. Lavy, V & Strauss, J & Thomas, D & de Vreyer, P, 1996. "Quality of Health Care, Survivial and Health Outcomes in Ghana," Papers, RAND - Reprint Series 96-20, RAND - Reprint Series.
    9. Kiefer, Nicholas M, 1988. "Economic Duration Data and Hazard Functions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 646-79, June.
    10. World Bank, 2002. "Arab Republic of Egypt : Cost Assessment of Environmental Degradation," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15323, The World Bank.
    11. Sulayman Al-Qudsi, 1998. "The demand for children in Arab countries: Evidence from panel and count data models," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 435-452.
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    Cited by:
    1. World Bank, 2012. "Monitoring Basic Opportunities throughout the Lifecycle with the Human Opportunity Index in Chile," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11919, The World Bank.
    2. Gamper-Rabindran, Shanti & Khan, Shakeeb & Timmins, Christopher, 2010. "The impact of piped water provision on infant mortality in Brazil: A quantile panel data approach," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 92(2), pages 188-200, July.

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