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Quality of Life and the Migration of the College-Educated: A Life-Course Approach

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  • RONALD L. WHISLER
  • BRIGITTE S. WALDORF
  • GORDON F. MULLIGAN
  • DAVID A. PLANE

Abstract

This paper examines how the college-educated population-segmented into selective demographic groups, from young adults to the elderly-differentially values quality-of-life (QOL) indicators of metropolitan areas in the United States. Using data from the 2000 Census and the 1997 "Places Rated Almanac", out-migration patterns are shown to depend jointly upon stage in the life course, the spatial-demographic setting, and QOL characteristics. An abundance of cultural and recreational amenities lowers out-migration rates of young college-educated. For the older college-educated population, the revealed preferences shift toward concerns for safety and a strong preference for milder climates. The study also finds significantly lower out-migration rates for metropolitan areas with growing human capital. In light of shifting age distributions and rising educational attainment levels, the results have important implications for the emergence of new migration patterns and the concentration of human capital. Copyright 2008 Blackwell Publishing.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky in its journal Growth and Change.

Volume (Year): 39 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 58-94

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Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:39:y:2008:i:1:p:58-94

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Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0017-4815

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Cited by:
  1. Rubén Hernández-Murillo & Lesli S. Ott & Michael T. Owyang & Denise Whalen, 2011. "Patterns of interstate migration in the United States from the survey of income and program participation," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 169-186.
  2. Carree, Martin & Kronenberg, Kristin, 2012. "Locational choices and the costs of distance: empirical evidence for Dutch graduates," MPRA Paper 36221, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Brigitte Waldorf, 2009. "Is human capital accumulation a self-propelling process? Comparing educational attainment levels of movers and stayers," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 323-344, June.
  4. Winters, John V., 2012. "Differences in Employment Outcomes for College Town Stayers and Leavers," IZA Discussion Papers 6723, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Winters, John V., 2011. "Human capital, higher education institutions, and quality of life," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(5), pages 446-454, September.
  6. David Plane, 2012. "What about aging in regional science?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 469-483, April.
  7. Gunderson, Ronald J. & Sorenson, David J., 2010. "An Examination of Domestic Migration from California Counties," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 40(1).
  8. Maria Abreu & Alessandra Faggian & Philip McCann, 2011. "Migration and inter-industry mobility of UK graduates: Effect on earnings and career satisfaction," ERSA conference papers ersa11p118, European Regional Science Association.
  9. Xinxiang Chen & Guangqing Chi, 2012. "Natural Beauty, Money, and the Distribution of Talent: A Local-Level Panel Data Analysis," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 31(5), pages 665-681, October.
  10. Winters, John V., 2013. "STEM Graduates, Human Capital Externalities, and Wages in the U.S," IZA Discussion Papers 7830, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Bohyun Jang & John Casterline & Anastasia Snyder, 2014. "Migration and marriage: Modeling the joint process," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(47), pages 1339-1366, April.
  12. Winters, John V, 2010. "Human Capital and Population Growth in Non-Metropolitan U.S. Counties: The Importance of College Student Migration," MPRA Paper 25592, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Terry Besser & Nancy Miller & Roshan Malik, 2012. "Community Amenity Measurement for the Great Fly-Over Zones," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 106(2), pages 393-405, April.
  14. Paulo Morais & Vera Miguéis & Ana Camanho, 2013. "Quality of Life Experienced by Human Capital: An Assessment of European Cities," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 110(1), pages 187-206, January.

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