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Education, inequality and transition

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  • John Micklewright

Abstract

Evidence is considered on differences in access to education and in learning achievement within the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. The situation inherited from the communist period is first summarized: there were some significant disparities with, for example, family background having a strong association with tertiary enrolments, as in Western countries. Analysis of the transition period focuses on the differences in access and achievement associated with household income and geographic location. Disparities are not the same across the region; in some countries, such as Russia, there are clear grounds for serious concern, but it is unlikely that any country has cause for complacency.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development in its journal The Economics of Transition.

Volume (Year): 7 (1999)
Issue (Month): 2 (July)
Pages: 343-376

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Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:7:y:1999:i:2:p:343-376

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  1. Zašto se studenti i uvaženi stručnjaci ne osvrnu na ovo?
    by cronomy in Cronomy on 2009-05-10 19:39:37
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Cited by:
  1. Bonev, Pavlin, 2013. "Government Intervention in Postsecondary Education in Bulgaria," MPRA Paper 52669, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Randall K. Filer & Daniel Munich, 2000. "Responses of Private and Public Schools to Voucher Funding:The Czech and Hungarian Experience," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp160, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague.
  3. Habibov, Nazim, 2012. "Early childhood care and education attendance in Central Asia," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 798-806.
  4. Cristina Iannelli, 2002. "Parental Education and Young People's Educational and Labour Market Outcomes: A Comparison across Europe," MZES Working Papers 45, MZES.
  5. Micklewright, John & Schnepf, Sylke V., 2006. "Inequality of Learning in Industrialised Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 2517, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Eichhorst, Werner & Rodríguez-Planas, Núria & Schmidl, Ricarda & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2012. "A Roadmap to Vocational Education and Training Systems Around the World," IZA Discussion Papers 7110, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Spagat, Michael, 2002. "Human Capital and the Future of Transition Economies," CEPR Discussion Papers 3517, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Filer, Randall K. & Münich, Daniel, 2013. "Responses of private and public schools to voucher funding," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 269-285.
  9. Polanec, Sašo & Ahčan, Aleš & Verbič, Miroslav, 2010. "Retirement Decisions in Transition: Microeconometric Evidence from Slovenia," MPRA Paper 28460, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Michael Spagat, 2002. "Human Capital, Growth and Inequality in Transition Economies," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 499, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  11. Giorgio Brunello & Elena Crivellaro & Lorenzo Rocco, 2012. "Lost in transition?," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 20(4), pages 637-676, October.
  12. Noland, Marcus & Son, Hyun H., 2012. "Editors’ introduction transitional economies: Progress and pitfalls," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 107-110.
  13. Biavaschi, Costanza & Eichhorst, Werner & Giulietti, Corrado & Kendzia, Michael J. & Muravyev, Alexander & Pieters, Janneke & Rodríguez-Planas, Núria & Schmidl, Ricarda & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2012. "Youth Unemployment and Vocational Training," IZA Discussion Papers 6890, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Pastore, Francesco, 2005. "To Study or to Work? Education and Labour Market Participation of Young People in Poland," IZA Discussion Papers 1793, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. Nancy Vandycke, 2001. "Access to Education for the Poor in Europe and Central Asia : Preliminary Evidence and Policy Implications," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13974, October.

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