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Human Capital, Growth and Inequality in Transition Economies

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  • Michael Spagat

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Abstract

Transition economies have an initial condition of high human capital relative to living standards. I explore the possible implications of this key fact by surveying and adapting literature on growth and inequality. I focus especially on the long run and policy options.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan in its series William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series with number 499.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: 01 Jul 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2002-499

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Keywords: Transition economies; human capital; growth; inequality; liquidity constraints; educational reform; long run;

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References

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  1. Daniel Gros & Marc Suhrcke, 2000. "Ten years after: what is special about transition countries?," Working Papers 56, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Office of the Chief Economist.
  2. Münich, Daniel & Svejnar, Jan & Terrell, Katherine, 2000. "Returns to Human Capital under the Communist Wage Grid and During the Transition to a Market Economy," IZA Discussion Papers 122, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Alan Krueger & Mikael Lindahl, 2000. "Education for Growth: Why and For Whom?," Working Papers 808, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  4. Galor, Oded & Zeira, Joseph, 1988. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," MPRA Paper 51644, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Sep 1989.
  5. Spagat, Michael, 2002. "Human Capital and the Future of Transition Economies," CEPR Discussion Papers 3517, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Perotti, Roberto, 1993. "Political Equilibrium, Income Distribution, and Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(4), pages 755-76, October.
  7. Roland Bénabou, 1996. "Inequality and Growth," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1996, Volume 11, pages 11-92 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre. MONEE project, 2000. "Young People in Changing Societies," Regional Monitoring Report remore00/13, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
  9. UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre. MONEE project, 2001. "A Decade of Transition," Regional Monitoring Report remore01/15, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
  10. John Micklewright, 1999. "Education, inequality and transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(2), pages 343-376, July.
  11. Alexeev, Michael & Kaganovich, Michael, 1998. "Returns to human capital under uncertain reform: Good guys finish last," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 53-70, September.
  12. Abhijit Banerjee & Andrew F. Newman, 1989. "Risk-Bearing and the Theory of Income Distribution," Discussion Papers 877, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  13. Fan, Chengze Simon & Overland, Jody & Spagat, Michael, 1999. "Human Capital, Growth, and Inequality in Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 618-643, December.
  14. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1998. "New ways of looking at old issues: inequality and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 259-287.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Alexander Muravyev, 2006. "Human Capital Externalities: Evidence from the Transition Economy of Russia," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 629, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  2. Mihails Hazans & Ija Trapeznikova & Olga Rastrigina, 2008. "Ethnic and parental effects on schooling outcomes before and during the transition: evidence from the Baltic countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 719-749, July.
  3. Mihails Hazans & Ija Trapeznikova, 2006. "Access to Secondary Education in Albania: Incentives, Obstacles, and Policy Spillovers," SSE Riga/BICEPS Research Papers 2006-1, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies (BICEPS) and Stockholm School of Economics in Riga (SSE Riga).

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