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Bones, Bombs, and Break Points: The Geography of Economic Activity

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  • Donald R. Davis
  • David E. Weinstein

Abstract

We consider the distribution of economic activity within a country in light of three leading theories—increasing returns, random growth, and locational fundamentals. To do so, we examine the distribution of regional population in Japan from the Stone Age to the modern era. We also consider the Allied bombing of Japanese cities in WWII as a shock to relative city sizes. Our results support a hybrid theory in which locational fundamentals establish the spatial pattern of relative regional densities, but increasing returns help to determine the degree of spatial differentiation. Long-run city size is robust even to large temporary shocks.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 92 (2002)
Issue (Month): 5 (December)
Pages: 1269-1289

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:92:y:2002:i:5:p:1269-1289

Note: DOI: 10.1257/000282802762024502
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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Economic lessons of the Kobe earthquake
    by Tyler Cowen in Marginal Revolution on 2011-03-11 14:01:43
  2. Economic lessons of the Kobe earthquake
    by Tyler Cowen in Cafe Hayek on 2011-03-11 14:01:43
  3. Conflicts and Economic Development
    by Dany Jaimovich - Bakary Baludin in Development Therapy on 2013-03-04 14:32:00
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  1. Talk:Development economics in Wikipedia English ne '')
  2. Historical Economic Geography
  3. Bones, Bombs, and Break Points: The Geography of Economic Activity (AER 2002) in ReplicationWiki

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