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From Locational Fundamentals to Increasing Returns: The Spatial Concentration of Population in Spain, 1787-2000

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Author Info

  • María Isabel Ayuda

    ()
    (Department of Economic Analysis. Faculty of Economics and Business Studies. University of Zaragoza.)

  • Fernando Collantes

    ()
    (Department of Applied Economics and Economic History. Faculty of Economics and Business Studies. University of Zaragoza.)

  • Vicente Pinilla

    ()
    (Department of Applied Economics and Economic History. Faculty of Economics and Business Studies. University of Zaragoza.)

Abstract

Does population follow the same inverted-U pattern of concentration/dispersion that has been found in the case of economic activity in the long run? In this paper we present the evidence for eight European countries during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and find that, contrary to the inverted-U hypothesis, population has shown a steady, long-run trend towards concentration. After that, we estimate population density and population growth equations for the case of one of these countries, Spain from 1787 to 2000. Our results suggest that locational fundamentals (such as natural endowments) explain the distribution of population before industrialization and that industrialization reinforced the pre-existing regional population disparities, especially as the share of increasing-returns sectors in the Spanish economy became significant (that is, mainly during the twentieth century).

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza in its series Documentos de Trabajo with number dt2005-05.

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Date of creation: May 2005
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Handle: RePEc:zar:wpaper:dt2005-05

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Keywords: economic geography; population history; locational fundamentals; increasing returns;

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Cited by:
  1. Raúl Serrano & Vicente Pinilla, 2013. "New directions of trade for the agri-food industry: a disaggregated approach for different income countries, 1963-2000," Documentos de Trabajo dt2013-02, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
  2. Agustín Gil, 2005. "Product differentiation in a mixed duopoly," Documentos de Trabajo dt2005-08, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
  3. Miguel Martín-Retorillo & Vincente Pinilla, 2012. "Why did agricultural labour productivity not converge in Europe from 1950 to 2005?," Working Papers 0025, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  4. Rafael González-Val & Daniel A. Tirado-Fabregat & Elisabet Viladecans-Marsal, 2013. "Market potential and city growth: Spain 1860-1960," Working Papers 2013/13, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  5. María Ayuda & Fernando Collantes & Vicente Pinilla, 2010. "Long-run regional population disparities in Europe during modern economic growth: a case study of Spain," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 273-295, April.
  6. Francisco J. Goerlich & Matilde Mas, 2008. "Empirical Evidence of Population Concentration in Spain, 1900-2001," Population (english edition), Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), vol. 63(4), pages 635-649.
  7. repec:wyi:journl:002175 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Ploeckl, Florian, 2012. "Endowments and market access; the size of towns in historical perspective: Saxony, 1550–1834," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 607-618.

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