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The Rise And Fall Of Spatial Inequalities In France: A Long-Run Perspective

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  • Pierre-Philippe Combes

    ()
    (GREQAM - Groupement de Recherche en Économie Quantitative d'Aix-Marseille - Université de la Méditerranée - Aix-Marseille II - Université Paul Cézanne - Aix-Marseille III - École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) - CNRS : UMR6579)

  • Miren Lafourcade

    (PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - CNRS : UMR8545 - École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) - École des Ponts ParisTech (ENPC) - École normale supérieure [ENS] - Paris)

  • Jacques-François Thisse

    (PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - CNRS : UMR8545 - École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) - École des Ponts ParisTech (ENPC) - École normale supérieure [ENS] - Paris, CORE - Center of Operation Research and Econometrics [Louvain] - Université Catholique de Louvain (UCL) - Belgique)

  • Jean-Claude Toutain

    (ERMES - Equipe de recherche sur les marches, l'emploi et la simulation - CNRS : FRE2887 - Université Paris II - Panthéon-Assas)

Abstract

This paper uses a unique database that provides value-added, employment, and population levels for the entire set of French departments for the years 1860, 1930, and 2000. These data cover three sectors: agriculture, manufacturing, and services. This allows us to study the evolution of spatial inequalities within France and to test the empirical relevance of economic geography predictions over the long run. The evidence confirms the existence of a bell-shaped evolution of the spatial concentration of manufacturing and services. In contrast, labor productivity has been converging across departments. Last, our study also confirms the presence of strong agglomeration economies during the full time-period. Market potential during the first sub-period (1860-1930), and higher education during the second (1930-2000), together with sectoral diversity, account for the spatial distribution of these gains.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by HAL in its series Working Papers with number halshs-00349293.

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Date of creation: 28 Dec 2008
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Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-00349293

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Keywords: Economic geography; agglomeration economies; human capital; economic history;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Dusan Paredes, 2010. "Can NEG explains the spatial distribution of wages in developing countries? Evidence from Chile," Documentos de Trabajo en Economia y Ciencia Regional 02, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Chile, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2010.
  2. Martinez-Galarraga, Julio, 2012. "The determinants of industrial location in Spain, 1856–1929," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 255-275.

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