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Upgrading or polarization? Occupational change in Britain, Germany, Spain and Switzerland, 1990-2008

Citations

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Cited by:

  1. David Brady & Thomas Biegert, 2017. "The Rise of Precarious Employment in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 936, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  2. Markus Klein, 2016. "The association between graduates’ field of study and occupational attainment in West Germany, 1980–2008 [Der Zusammenhang zwischen Studienfach und beruflichem Erfolg von Hochschulabsolventen in We," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 49(1), pages 43-58, July.
  3. Michael Mesch, 2016. "Erwerbs- und Einkommenschancen im Kontext der intergenerationellen Einkommenspersistenz," Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft - WuG, Kammer für Arbeiter und Angestellte für Wien, Abteilung Wirtschaftswissenschaft und Statistik, vol. 42(4), pages 617-664.
  4. Arntz, Melanie & Gregory, Terry & Zierahn, Ulrich, 2016. "ELS issues in robotics and steps to consider them. Part 1: Robotics and employment. Consequences of robotics and technological change for the structure and level of employment," ZEW Expertises, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research, number 146501.
  5. Francis Kuriakose & Deepa Kylasam Iyer, 2020. "Job Polarisation in India: Structural Causes and Policy Implications," The Indian Journal of Labour Economics, Springer;The Indian Society of Labour Economics (ISLE), vol. 63(2), pages 247-266, June.
  6. Vasiliy Anikin, 2013. "Mode of Socio-Economic Development and Occupational Structure: The Case of Contemporary Russia," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 19(4), pages 397-415, March.
  7. Sandra Silva & Jorge Valente & Aurora Teixeira, 2012. "An evolutionary model of industry dynamics and firms’ institutional behavior with job search, bargaining and matching," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 7(1), pages 23-61, May.
  8. Fabian Sander & Irene Kriesi, 2019. "Medium and Long-Term Returns to Professional Education in Switzerland: Explaining Differences between Occupational Fields," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 7(3), pages 136-153.
  9. Andreas Beerli & Ronald Indergand, 2014. "Which factors drive the skill-mix of migrants in the long-run?," ECON - Working Papers 182, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
  10. repec:clr:wugarc:y:2016v:42i:04p:617 is not listed on IDEAS
  11. Stefan Thewissen & Chen Wang & Olaf van Vliet, 2013. "Sectoral trends in earnings inequality and employment International trade, skill-biased technological change, or labour market institutions?," LIS Working papers 595, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
  12. Arjen Edzes & Marije Hamersma & Viktor Venhorst & Jouke Dijk, 2015. "Labour market performance and school careers of low educated graduates," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 267-289, November.
  13. Bruno Funchal & Jandir Soares Junior, 2013. "Understanding demand for skylls after technological trade liberalization," Fucape Working Papers 40, Fucape Business School.
  14. Van Winkle, Zachary & Fasang, Anette Eva, 2017. "Complexity in Employment Life Courses in Europe in the Twentieth Century—Large Cross-National Differences but Little Change across Birth Cohorts," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 1-30.
  15. Duncan Gallie, 2012. "Skills, Job Control and the Quality of Work:The Evidence from Britain Geary Lecture 2012," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 43(3), pages 325-341.
  16. Hope, David & Martelli, Angelo, 2019. "The transition to the knowledge economy, labor market institutions, and income inequality in advanced democracies," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 100382, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  17. Valeria Cirillo & Mario Pianta & Leopoldo Nascia, 2015. "The Dynamics of Skills: Technology and Business Cycles," LEM Papers Series 2015/30, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  18. Hunt, Jennifer & Nunn, Ryan, 2019. "Is Employment Polarization Informative about Wage Inequality and Is Employment Really Polarizing?," IZA Discussion Papers 12472, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  19. Maarten Goos & Melanie Arntz & Ulrich Zierahn & Terry Gregory & Stephanie Carretero Gomez & Ignacio Gonzalez Vazquez & Koen Jonkers, 2019. "The Impact of Technological Innovation on the Future of Work," JRC Working Papers on Labour, Education and Technology 2019-03, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
  20. Pekkala Kerr, Sari & Maczulskij, Terhi & Maliranta, Mika, 2016. "Within and Between Firm Trends in Job Polarization: Role of Globalization and Technology," ETLA Working Papers 41, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
  21. Balsmeier, Benjamin & Woerter, Martin, 2019. "Is this time different? How digitalization influences job creation and destruction," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(8), pages 1-1.
  22. Bisello, Martina, 2014. "How does immigration affect natives’ task-specialisation? Evidence from the United Kingdom," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-12, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  23. Martina Bisello, 2013. "Job polarization in Britain from a task-based perspective.Evidence from the UK Skills Surveys," Discussion Papers 2013/160, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
  24. Nofal, María B. & Coremberg, Ariel & Sartorio, Luca, 2018. "Data, measurement and initiatives for inclusive digitalization and future of work," Economics Discussion Papers 2018-71, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  25. Sudipa Sarkar, 2017. "Employment polarization and over-education in Germany, Spain, Sweden and UK," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 44(3), pages 435-463, August.
  26. Sebastian, Raquel & Harrison, Scott, 2017. "Beyond technological explanations of employment polarisation in Spain," GLO Discussion Paper Series 154, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  27. Daniela Rohrbach-Schmidt & Michael Tiemann, 2016. "Educational (Mis)match and skill utilization in Germany: Assessing the role of worker and job characteristics [Qualifikatorisches (Mis)matching und die Ausnutzung von fachlichen Kenntnissen und Fäh," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 49(2), pages 99-119, October.
  28. Eleftheria KOLOKYTHA & Georgios KOLOKYTHAS & Fotini PERDIKI & Stavros VALSAMIDIS, 2018. "Labour Job Digitalization: Myths And Realities," Scientific Bulletin - Economic Sciences, University of Pitesti, vol. 17(2), pages 3-18.
  29. Reichelt, Malte & Abraham, Martin, 2015. "Occupational and regional mobility as substitutes : a new approach to understanding job changes and wage inequality," IAB Discussion Paper 201514, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  30. Christian Dudel & María Andrée López Gómez & Fernando G. Benavides & Mikko Myrskylä, 2018. "The Length of Working Life in Spain: Levels, Recent Trends, and the Impact of the Financial Crisis," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 34(5), pages 769-791, December.
  31. Pavolini, Emmanuele & Kuhlmann, Ellen, 2016. "Health workforce development in the European Union: A matrix for comparing trajectories of change in the professions," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 120(6), pages 654-664.
  32. Aepli, Manuel, 2019. "Technological change and occupation mobility: A task-based approach to horizontal mismatch," GLO Discussion Paper Series 361, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  33. V. Nellas & E. Olivieri, 2012. "The Change of Job Opportunities: the Role of Computerization and Institutions," Working Papers wp804, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  34. Rosalia Castellano & Gaetano Musella & Gennaro Punzo, 2019. "Exploring changes in the employment structure and wage inequality in Western Europe using the unconditional quantile regression," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 46(2), pages 249-304, May.
  35. Raquel Sebastian, 2018. "Explaining job polarisation in Spain from a task perspective," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 215-248, June.
  36. Valeria Cirillo & Mario Pianta & Leopoldo Nascia, 2018. "Technology and Occupations in Business Cycles," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(2), pages 1-25, February.
  37. Pikos, Anna Katharina & Thomsen, Stephan L., 2015. "Tasks, Employment and Wages: An Analysis of the German Labor Market from 1979 to 2012," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112929, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  38. David Brady & Thomas Biegert, 2017. "The Rise of Precarious Employment in Germany," LIS Working papers 708, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
  39. Valeria Cirillo & Rinaldo Evangelista & Dario Guarascio & Matteo Sostero, 2019. "Digitalization, routineness and employment: An exploration on Italian task-based data," LEM Papers Series 2019/18, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  40. Krzywdzinski, Martin, 2017. "Automation, skill requirements and labour-use strategies: high-wage and low-wage approaches to high-tech manufacturing in the automotive industry," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 247-267.
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