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Reinterpreting Economic Growth: Parables and Realities

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  1. Greenwood, Jeremy & Yorukoglu, Mehmet, 1997. "1974," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 49-95, June.
    • Greenwood, J. & Yorukoglu, M., 1996. "1974," RCER Working Papers 429, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  2. Reinstaller, Andreas & Holzl, Werner, 2001. "The Technological Bias in the Establishment of a Technological Regime: the adoption and enforcement of early information processing technologies in US manufacturing, 1870-1930," Research Memorandum 013, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  3. Cristiano Antonelli & Pier Paolo Patrucco & Francesco Quatraro, 2008. "The governance of localized knowledge externalities," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(4), pages 479-498.
  4. Kevin H. O'Rourke & Ahmed S. Rahman & Alan M. Taylor, 2007. "Trade, Knowledge and the Industrial Revolution," Development Working Papers 230, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
  5. Alan M. Taylor, 1996. "International Capital Mobility in History: The Saving-Investment Relationship," NBER Working Papers 5743, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Consoli, Davide, 2005. "The dynamics of technological change in UK retail banking services: An evolutionary perspective," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 461-480, May.
  7. Field, Alexander J., 2009. "US economic growth in the gilded age," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 173-190, March.
  8. Gavin Wright, 1999. "Can a Nation Learn? American Technology as a Network Phenomenon," NBER Chapters, in: Learning by Doing in Markets, Firms, and Countries, pages 295-332, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Knick Harley, 2003. "Growth theory and industrial revolutions in Britain and America," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 36(4), pages 809-831, November.
  10. R. M. McInnis, 1986. "Output and Productivity in Canadian Agriculture, 1870-71 to 1926-27," NBER Chapters, in: Long-Term Factors in American Economic Growth, pages 737-778, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Ian W. McLean & Alan M. Taylor, 2001. "Australian Growth: A California Perspective," NBER Working Papers 8408, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Kuwahara, Shiro, 2019. "Multiplicity and stagnation under the Romer model with increasing returns of R&D," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 86-97.
  13. Rafi Amir-ud-Din & Muhammad Usman & Faisal Abbas & Sajid Amin Javed, 2019. "Human versus physical capital: issues of accumulation, interaction and endogeneity," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 52(4), pages 351-382, November.
  14. James Bessen, 2008. "Accounting for Productivity Growth When Technical Change is Biased," Working Papers 0802, Research on Innovation.
  15. Demeulemeester, Jean-Luc, 2009. "Comment on "US Economic growth in the gilded age"," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 191-199, March.
  16. Jeremy Greenwood, 1999. "The Third Industrial Revolution," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Q II, pages 2-12.
  17. Alex Mourmouras & Peter Rangazas, 2009. "Reconciling Kuznets and Habbakuk in a unified growth theory," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 149-181, June.
  18. C. Knick Harley, 2000. "A Review of O'Rourke and Williamson's Globalization and History: The Evolution of a Nineteenth Century Atlantic Economy," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(4), pages 926-935, December.
  19. David, P. A., 1997. "From market magic to calypso science policy a review of Terence Kealey's The economic laws of scientific research," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 229-255, May.
  20. Suto, Isao & James, John A., 1999. "Savings and early economic growth in the United States and Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 161-183, April.
  21. McLean, Ian W., 2007. "Why was Australia so rich?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 635-656, October.
  22. Vasilev, Aleksandar, 2015. "Growth and convergence in the Central and East European countries towards EU (1992-2002)," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 63-89.
  23. Broadberry, Stephen; Crafts, Nicholas., 2010. "Openness, Protectionism And Britain’S Productivity Performance Over The Long-Run," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 36, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
  24. Edward N. Wolff, 2000. "Productiivity Convergence among OECD Countries: The Postwar Experience," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 1, pages 17-22, Fall.
  25. J. Bradford De Long & Lawrence H. Summers, 1991. "Equipment Investment and Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 445-502.
  26. Paul A. David, 1996. "Real Income and Economic Welfare Growth in the Early Republic or, Another Try at Getting the American Story Straight," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _005, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  27. Viarengo, Martina, 2007. "An historical analysis of the expansion of compulsory schooling in Europe after the Second World War," Economic History Working Papers 4286, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  28. Danny Givon, 2006. "Factor Replacement versus Factor Substitution, Mechanization and Asymptotic Harrod Neutrality," DEGIT Conference Papers c011_028, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
  29. Douglas A. Galbi, 2003. "A New Account of Personalization and Effective Communication," Economic History 0304001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  30. Hayami, Yujiro & Ogasawara, Junichi, 1999. "Changes in the Sources of Modern Economic Growth: Japan Compared with the United States," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 1-21, March.
  31. Susan B. Carter & Richard Sutch, 1997. "Historical Perspectives on the Economic Consequences of Immigration into the United States," NBER Historical Working Papers 0106, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  32. Greasley, David & Oxley, Les, 1998. "Comparing British and American Economic and Industrial Performance 1860-1993: A Time Series Perspective," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 171-195, April.
  33. Nazrul Islam, 2003. "What have We Learnt from the Convergence Debate?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(3), pages 309-362, July.
  34. Rossitsa Rangelova, 2008. "A Criticism of the Concept and Measure for Total Factor Productivity," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 3, pages 30-49.
  35. John A. James, 1985. "Shifts in the Nineteenth-Century Phillips Curve Relationship," NBER Working Papers 1587, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  36. David, P.A., 1989. "Computer And Dynamo: The Modern Productivity Paradox In A Not-Too Distant Mirror," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 339, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  37. Broadberry, Stephen N. & Irwin, Douglas A., 2006. "Labor productivity in the United States and the United Kingdom during the nineteenth century," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 257-279, April.
  38. Shiro Kuwahara, 2013. "Dynamical analysis of the R&D-based growth model with a regime switch," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 108(1), pages 35-57, January.
  39. Paul A. David, 2005. "Two Centuries of American Macroeconomic Growth From Exploitation of Resource Abundance to Knowledge-Driven Development," Macroeconomics 0502021, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  40. Martin Dribe & Michel Oris & Lucia Pozzi, 2014. "Socioeconomic status and fertility before, during, and after the demographic transition: An introduction," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(7), pages 161-182.
  41. Trajkova-Najdovska Nataša & Radukić Snežana, 2017. "Testing Instability in Growth Patterns in the Course of Transition: Evidence for Balkan Countries," Economic Themes, Sciendo, vol. 55(4), pages 451-463, December.
  42. Andreas Reinstaller & Werner Hölzl, 2001. "The creative response in economic development: the case of information processing technologies in US manufacturing, 1870-1930," Working Papers geewp15, Vienna University of Economics and Business Research Group: Growth and Employment in Europe: Sustainability and Competitiveness.
  43. James Bessen, 2009. "More Machines, Better Machines...Or Better Workers?," Working Papers 0803, Research on Innovation.
  44. Prados de la Escosura, Leandro & Rosés, Joan R., 2003. "Wages and labor income in history : a survey," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wh031006, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
  45. David, P.A., 2000. "Understanding Digital Technology's Evolution and the Path of Measured Productivity Growth: Present and Future in the Mirror of the Past," Papers 99-011, United Nations World Employment Programme-.
  46. Leonard Kukić, 2021. "The Nature Of Technological Failure: Patterns Of Biased Technical Change In Socialist Europe," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(3), pages 895-925, July.
  47. David, Paul A., 1989. "COMPUTER AND DYNAMO: The Modern Productivity Paradox in a Not-Too Distant Mirror," Economic Research Papers 268373, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
  48. Alan Green, 1986. "Growth and Productivity Change in the Canadian Railway Sector, 1871-1926," NBER Chapters, in: Long-Term Factors in American Economic Growth, pages 779-818, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  49. Toh, Mun Heng & Ng, Wai Choong, 2002. "Efficiency of investments in Asian economies: has Singapore over-invested," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 52-71.
  50. Justman, Moshe, 2004. "Transitional dynamics of output, wages and profits in innovation-led growth: a general equilibrium analysis," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 183-205, June.
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