IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/zewdip/5403.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Climate politics from Kyoto to Bonn: from little to nothing?!?

Author

Listed:
  • Böhringer, Christoph

Abstract

We investigate how the U.S. withdrawal and the amendments of the Bonn climate policy conference in 2001 will change the economic and environmental impacts of the Kyoto Protocol in its original form. Based on simulations with a large-scale computable general equilibrium model, we find that U.S. withdrawal together with the new provisions of Bonn are likely to reduce environmental effectiveness to zero. U.S. compliance under the new Bonn amendments would accommodate a substantial cut in global emissions at small compliance costs for OECD countries rising some hopes that the U.S. might rejoin the Kyoto Protocol during the next years.

Suggested Citation

  • Böhringer, Christoph, 2001. "Climate politics from Kyoto to Bonn: from little to nothing?!?," ZEW Discussion Papers 01-49, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:5403
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/24470/1/dp0149.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Böhringer, Christoph & Vogt, Carsten, 2001. "Internationaler Klimaschutz: Nicht mehr als symbolische Politik?," ZEW Discussion Papers 01-06, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    2. Paul M. Bernstein & W. David Montgomery & Thomas F. Rutherford & Gui-Fang Yang, 1999. "Effects of Restrictions on International Permit Trading: The MS-MRT Model," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 221-256.
    3. Christoph Böhringer & Thomas Rutherford, 2002. "Carbon Abatement and International Spillovers," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 22(3), pages 391-417, July.
    4. Johannes Bollen & Arjen Gielen & Hans Timmer, 1999. "Clubs, Ceilings and CDM: Macroeconomics of Compliance with the Kyoto Protocol," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 177-206.
    5. Bohringer, Christoph, 2000. "Cooling down hot air: a global CGE analysis of post-Kyoto carbon abatement strategies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(11), pages 779-789, September.
    6. Böhringer, Christoph & Jensen, Jesper & Rutherford, Thomas F., 1999. "Energy market projections and differentiated carbon abatement in the European Union," ZEW Discussion Papers 99-11, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Barbara Buchner & Carlo Carraro, 2004. "Economic and environmental effectiveness of a technology-based climate protocol," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 229-248, September.
    2. Warwick McKibbin & Peter Wilcoxen, 2008. "Building On Kyoto: Towards A Realistic Global Climate Agreement," CAMA Working Papers 2008-13, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    3. Barbara Buchner & Carlo Carraro & Igor Cersosimo & Carmen Marchiori, 2002. "Back to Kyoto? US Participation and the Linkage between R&D and Climate Cooperation," CESifo Working Paper Series 688, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Klepper, Gernot & Peterson, Sonja, 2006. "Marginal abatement cost curves in general equilibrium: The influence of world energy prices," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 1-23, January.
    5. Peter Russ & Patrick Criqui, 2007. "Post-Kyoto CO2 emission reduction : the soft landing scenario analysed with POLES and other world models," Post-Print halshs-00078489, HAL.
    6. Warwick McKibbin & Adele Morris & Peter Wilcoxen, 2008. "Expecting The Unexpected: Macroeconomic Volatility And Climate Policy," CAMA Working Papers 2008-35, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    7. Gernot Klepper & Sonja Peterson, 2005. "Trading Hot-Air. The Influence of Permit Allocation Rules, Market Power and the US Withdrawal from the Kyoto Protocol," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 32(2), pages 205-228, October.
    8. Dissou, Yazid & Mac Leod, Carolyn & Souissi, Mokhtar, 2002. "Compliance costs to the Kyoto Protocol and market structure in Canada: a dynamic general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 24(7-8), pages 751-779, November.
    9. VAN STEENBERGHE, Vincent, 2003. "CO2 abatement costs and permits price : Exploring the impact of banking and the role of future commitments," CORE Discussion Papers 2003098, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    10. Reto Schleiniger, 2004. "Global Carbon Trade and Local Externalities," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 140(II), pages 245-264, June.
    11. den Elzen, Michel G. J. & de Moor, Andre P. G., 2002. "Analyzing the Kyoto Protocol under the Marrakesh Accords: economic efficiency and environmental effectiveness," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2-3), pages 141-158, December.
    12. den Elzen, Michel & Roelfsema, Mark & Slingerland, Stephan, 2010. "Dealing with surplus emissions in the climate negotiations after Copenhagen: What are the options for compromise?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 6615-6628, November.
    13. Kemfert, Claudia & Zhang, ZhongXiang, 2003. "Linking developing country's cooperation on climate control with industrialized country's R&D and technology transfer," MPRA Paper 41473, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Bernard, A. & Haurie, A. & Vielle, M. & Viguier, L., 2008. "A two-level dynamic game of carbon emission trading between Russia, China, and Annex B countries," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1830-1856, June.
    15. Klepper, Gernot & Peterson, Sonja, 2002. "US participation, permit allocation, and hot air supply," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 4237, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    16. Buchner, Barbara & Carraro, Carlo & Cersosimo, Igor, 2002. "On the Consequences of the US Withdrawal from the Kyoto/Bonn Protocol," CEPR Discussion Papers 3239, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Sekar, Ram C. & Parsons, John E. & Herzog, Howard J. & Jacoby, Henry D., 2007. "Future carbon regulations and current investments in alternative coal-fired power plant technologies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 1064-1074, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    climate policy; emission trading; computable general equilibrium;

    JEL classification:

    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy
    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:5403. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/zemande.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.