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Pre-departure policies for migrants' origin countries

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  • Barsbai, Toman

Abstract

International migration generates large benefits for migrants and their family members who stay behind. But migrants' socio-economic integration in destination countries is often imperfect and many migrants face the risk of exploitation. Migrants' origin countries should therefore consider policies to increase the benefits of international migration. Pre-departure orientation seminars for migrants and financial education can improve migrant's decision-making. Likewise, behavioral interventions can reduce migrant mistreatment. These policy options are low-cost and have shown promising impact in the contexts they were evaluated. It may pay off to experiment with them in other contexts.

Suggested Citation

  • Barsbai, Toman, 2018. "Pre-departure policies for migrants' origin countries," PEGNet Policy Briefs 14/2018, PEGNet - Poverty Reduction, Equity and Growth Network, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:pegnpb:142018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David McKenzie & Dean Yang, 2015. "Evidence on Policies to Increase the Development Impacts of International Migration," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 30(2), pages 155-192.
    2. Emily A. Beam & David McKenzie & Dean Yang, 2016. "Unilateral Facilitation Does Not Raise International Labor Migration from the Philippines," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(2), pages 323-368.
    3. Michael Clemens & Claudio Montenegro & Lant Pritchett, 2008. "The Place Premium: Wage Differences for Identical Workers across the U.S. Border," Working Papers 148, Center for Global Development.
    4. Beam, Emily A., 2016. "Do job fairs matter? Experimental evidence on the impact of job-fair attendance," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 32-40.
    5. Doi, Yoko & McKenzie, David & Zia, Bilal, 2014. "Who you train matters: Identifying combined effects of financial education on migrant households," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 39-55.
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