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Commentaires sur « Des politiques migratoires pour promouvoir le développement »

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  • Melissa Siegel

Abstract

In recent years, remittances have assumed their place in the spotlight when it comes to the nexus between migration and development. While the positive effect of remittances is undeniable, one has to question the long-lasting sustainability of policies such as the reduction of transaction costs. Particular attention should be paid to the study of migrant behaviour in the face of permanent reductions in costs, rather than one-off discounts. It is also necessary to explore other policies which can mitigate the potential costs of migration and improve the migration framework in a way that fosters development.

Suggested Citation

  • Melissa Siegel, 2017. "Commentaires sur « Des politiques migratoires pour promouvoir le développement »," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 25(1), pages 97-103.
  • Handle: RePEc:cai:edddbu:edd_311_0097
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    References listed on IDEAS

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