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Monetary Policy and Credit in China: a Theoretical Analysis


  • Huw D. Dixon
  • John Bennett


A three-sector macro model of the Chinese economy is developed in which the activity of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) is constrained by the state-imposed credit plan for working capital. Our analysis indicates the weaknesses of credit control and nominal interest rate increases as tools for holding down the price level; but the hardening of SOEs’ budget constraints is found to be an effective device. The existence of credit and currency controls tends to make devaluation contractionary. Because of general equilibrium repercussions, policies that boost industrial exports tend to reduce welfare in the agricultural sector, where poverty is concentrated.

Suggested Citation

  • Huw D. Dixon & John Bennett, "undated". "Monetary Policy and Credit in China: a Theoretical Analysis," Discussion Papers 98/17, Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:98/17

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Wing Thye Woo, 2000. "Understanding china's economic performance," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 1-50.
    2. Qin, Duo, 1994. "Money demand in China: The effect of economic reform," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 253-271.
    3. Gao, X. M. & Wailes, Eric J. & Cramer, Gail L., 1996. "Partial Rationing and Chinese Urban Household Food Demand Analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 43-62, February.
    4. Laurence Ball & David Romer, 1990. "Real Rigidities and the Non-Neutrality of Money," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(2), pages 183-203.
    5. Van Wijnbergen, Sweder, 1986. "Exchange rate management and stabilization policies in developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 227-247, October.
    6. Blanchard, Olivier Jean & Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro, 1987. "Monopolistic Competition and the Effects of Aggregate Demand," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 647-666, September.
    7. Brada, Josef C & Kutan, Ali M & Zhou, Su, 1993. "China's Exchange Rate and the Balance of Trade," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 229-242.
    8. Bennett, John & Dixon, Huw David, 1996. "A Macrotheoretic Model of the Chinese Economy," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 277-294, June.
    9. Allsopp, Christopher, 1995. "Macroeconomic Control and Reform in China," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(4), pages 43-53, Winter.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sushanta K. Mallick, 2014. "Disentangling the Poverty Effects of Sectoral Output, Prices, and Policies in India," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(4), pages 773-801, December.
    2. Dickinson, David & Liu, Jia, 2007. "The real effects of monetary policy in China: An empirical analysis," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 87-111.
    3. Phylaktis, Kate & Girardin, Eric, 2001. "Foreign exchange markets in transition economies: China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 215-235, February.
    4. Zhang, Yin & Wan, Guanghua, 2004. "Output and Price Fluctuations in China's Reform Years: What Role did Money Play?," WIDER Working Paper Series 056, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Meixing Dai, 2006. "Inflation-targeting under a Managed Exchange Rate: the Case of the Chinese Central Bank," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 199-219.
    6. Yan, Isabel K. & Kakkar, Vikas, 2010. "The equilibrium real exchange rate of China: a productivity approach," MPRA Paper 35229, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O23 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Fiscal and Monetary Policy in Development
    • P21 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform

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