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Sheer Class? Returns to educational performance : evidence from UK graduates first destination labour market outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • McKnight, Abigail

    (London School of Economics)

  • Naylor, Robin

    (University of Warwick)

  • Smith, Jeremy

    (University of Warwick)

Abstract

We exploit individual-level administrative data for whole populations of UK university students for the leaving cohorts of 1985-1993 (together with that of 1998) to investigate the influence of degree performance on graduate occupational earnings. We find that there is a significant premium associated with a good performance at university. We also find that this premium increased between 1985/6 and 1993/4, a period of substantial expansion in the graduate population. Among other results, we find that there are significant differences in the occupational earnings of leavers according to university attended, subject studied, and pre-university educational and social background, ceteris paribus.

Suggested Citation

  • McKnight, Abigail & Naylor, Robin & Smith, Jeremy, 2007. "Sheer Class? Returns to educational performance : evidence from UK graduates first destination labour market outcomes," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 786, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wrk:warwec:786
    as

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    File URL: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/research/workingpapers/2008/twerp_786.pdf
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. "Contacts, contacts, contacts"
      by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2008-01-29 18:44:52

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Feng, Andy & Graetz, Georg, 2017. "A question of degree: The effects of degree class on labor market outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 140-161.
    2. Freier, Ronny & Schumann, Mathias & Siedler, Thomas, 2015. "The earnings returns to graduating with honors — Evidence from law graduates," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 39-50.
    3. Peter Davies & Guy Durden, 2010. "Economic Education in Schools and Universities in England," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(4), pages 413-424, September.
    4. Flannery, Darragh & O’Donoghue, Cathal, 2013. "The demand for higher education: A static structural approach accounting for individual heterogeneity and nesting patterns," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 243-257.
    5. Jake Anders, 2015. "Does socioeconomic background affect pay growth among early entrants to high-status jobs?," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 453, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Graduate earnings ; degree class ; educational performance;

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J4 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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