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Police numbers up, crime rates down. The effect of police on crime in the Netherlands, 1996-2003

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  • Ben Vollaard

    (CPB)

Abstract

We present evidence on the effect of greater numbers of police personnel on crime and nuisance reduction in the Netherlands. We use a multiple time series design with police regions as the unit of analysis, covering the period 1996-2003. During this period, police resources increased substantially. The growth in additional resources differed greatly between regions, allowing us to use this policy intervention to identify the effect of police on crime and nuisance. We control for regional economic, social and demographic factors and for national trends that might obscure the effect of police on crime. We find significantly negative effects of higher police levels on property crime, violent crime and nuisance. Our estimates suggest that a substantial proportion of the decline in crime and nuisance during the period 1996-2003 is attributable to the increase in police personnel.

Suggested Citation

  • Ben Vollaard, 2005. "Police numbers up, crime rates down. The effect of police on crime in the Netherlands, 1996-2003," Law and Economics 0501006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwple:0501006
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 58
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    police; crime; nuisance; effectiveness; victimisation survey;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • K4 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior

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